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Shelve It: In Which We Buy All the Books

weekly feature to share the books magan and estelle are adding to their bookshelves each week

Howdy, friends! We’re both checking in to confess how many books share the books we’ve purchased lately with another Shelve It. It’s been a good, good month for reading and we both, um, went a little overboard. Our wallets are feeling quite depleted, but we’re really excited about all of these and we hope you are, too!

Magan:

First up is this glorious book I received from Macmillan, Unremembered by Jessica Brody. (Thank you so much, you guys!) It’s been optioned for film by Reliance Entertainment and Kintop Pictures. I have been wanting to read Unremembered FOREVER and I’m super excited about this! (PS — Congratulations, Jessica!)

Unremembered optioned for film - macmillan publishing

And my (super incriminating) purchases: a screenshot from my amazon orders page. Ooops?!

Books Purchased by Magan

What I Thought Was True by Huntley Fitzpatrick
Pointe by Brandy Colbert (per Estelle’s amazing blurb on Goodreads)
Noggin by John Corey Whaley
There Will Come a Time by Carrie Arcos (again because Estelle gave this 5 stars!)
The Edge of Falling by Rebecca Serle
Don’t Even Think About It by Sarah Mlynowski
Panic by Lauren Oliver

*Not pictured because I pre-ordered it (but it was also delivered last week): To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han (because, duh. It’s Jenny.)

ARC e-galley approvals:

Edelweiss Approved ARC books

Through to You by Lauren Barnholdt
Rites of Passage by Joy Hensley
On the Fence by Kasie West

Estelle:

Well, it was a marathon of a book event week last week. THREE IN FIVE DAYS. Insane. Normally I just pick one but they were just too good to pass up — Jennifer E. Smith, Sara Benincasa, and Jenny Han — so I skipped the gym, bought a lot of books, and even had a beer in Books of Wonder in NYC. (Thanks to Jenny Han’s great launch setup. The goodies were amazing.) Here are some pictures from the week:

Jennifer E Smith Jackson McNally April 2014

Sara Benincasa Books of Wonder April 2014

Jenny Han Books of Wonder April 2014

A few highlights:

  • Jen E. Smith reminiscing about first moving to New York during the 2003 blackout. She was ATM and suddenly nothing was working.
  • Sara Benincasa is hilarious, and I loved hearing her read from GREAT. It’s always so interesting to hear the inflections in the author’s voice compared to your own. Her next book is going to be a re-telling of Lord of the Flies starring the ladies. Looking forward to that one!
  • And Jenny Han made me a little weepy talking about how close she is with her sister and how she finds her sister always worms her way into her books. She also mentioned how she realized how much things were changing when her sister got married and they wouldn’t be spending Christmas mornings together like they used to. This is a feeling I struggle with a lot and I’m glad I wasn’t the only one.

I was a little tricky and fit all my books into one picture. Hopefully it looks less severe?

Shelve It April 22 2014

Deep Blue by Jennifer Donnelly (from Disney Press; thanks!)
After Hello by Lisa Magnum (sent to me by Kelly for a super secret project!)
Open Road Summer by Emery Lord (my pre-order came six days late!)
What I Thought Was True by Huntley Fitzpatrick (thanks to Emily @ohmagichour for my #AndiSpringExchange gift!)
Shug by Jenny Han (this is a middle grade book)
Nantucket Blue by Leila Howland (I needed the paperback! There’s chevron inside!)
Burn for Burn by Jenny Han and Siobhan Vivian
To All the Boys I Loved Before by Jenny Han
The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith
Great by Sara J. Benincasa

I’m definitely cut off, right? As you can tell, I’m going to be busy for awhile. I think M + I both are. So what about you? Anything fantastic make its way on to your shelves lately? Let us know! We are curious and nosey and we probably need to add more books to our TBR — because that’s what we do!

Happy Wednesday — we’re halfway there, folks!

Psst! Don’t forget to enter our giveaway for an ONLY EVERYTHING signed arc (U.S. + Canada) and check out reviews of Don’t Call Me Baby by Gwen Heasley; The Summer I Wasn’t Me by Jess Verdi; Life By Committee by Corey Ann Haydu.

April 23, 2014 - 12:20 pm

Quinn @ Quinn's Book Nook - I don’t think you guys picked up too many books at all. Of course, I might not be the best person to ask that question :)

That’s awesome that there were so many book events last week, Estelle. Magan, I haven’t read Unremembered, but it’s definitely on my list. I got to see Jessica Brody at the Rochester Teen Book Fest last year, and she was a fun speaker.

Enjoy all your goodies and happy reading! :)

Tête-à-tête with ONLY EVERYTHING’s Cupid a.k.a. True

Greetings, friends! It’s a special, special day at Rather Be Reading Blog. Contemporary YA author Kieran Scott has granted me special access to the leading lady of her new trilogy, ONLY EVERYTHING. That’s right. Today I am talking to True a.k.a. Cupid. I know, I know… you are wondering why cupid isn’t a chubby little baby with a bow and arrow. THAT’S A MYTH FOLKS. The true True was banished to Earth after Zeus discovers she has been actively engaged in a relationship with a mortal. In order to get back to her love and back to Olympus, True has to make a love connection between three couples — not realizing just how difficult life in New Jersey for a goddess could be.

True from Only Everything by Kieran Scott

Yes, that’s Anna Scott from Pitch Perfect. She’s how I picture True. :)

A few quick thoughts on the book: My Greek mythology is a little rusty but it came back to me so easily in Only Everything. Plus the entire book was more laugh out loud funny than I ever expected; Scott folded in some details I never would have thought of and it made the story so lush and well-done. True is basically an alien in New Jersey and she tries to act as normal as possible but it’s so hard for her — which makes it even more difficult for her to make love connections. Without powers. Without any idea of how Earth works. In addition to True, the chapters alternate between the POVs of Katrina and Charlie, two other students at the high school. Genuinely nice people who are struggling in some way (Charlie is the new kid at school…again; Katrina’s dad died and her relationship with her mom has become difficult). Friendship, silly / ridiculous times, falling in love, fitting in = ONLY EVERYTHING. So addicting, so fun (seriously, I could not put it down).

Basically:

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And now for that interview with TRUE from Only Everything. Away, we go….

True, it is totally an honor to be talking to you today! I should tell you up front that I ignored my husband for a lot of the time I was reading your story. (That’s true love, right?) After all of your “adventure” on Earth, what are three tips you would give the next God or Goddess banished to Earth?

It’s an honor to be interviewed! Now go take your husband out for pie!:)My three tips for any God or Goddess banished to Earth would be:

1) Look in the mirror before you leave the house and make the proper adjustments. (We’re used to looking perfect all the time, no matter what. Mortals have to put in a lot of work.)

2) Expect your new body to turn on you in sudden and unpleasant ways. (Before I became mortal I had never vomited, sneezed, hiccupped, burped, gained weight, passed gas or sprouted a zit. None are very much fun. Except sneezing. That can leave a pleasant tingling sensation.)

3) Know that nothing will be easy. (On Mount Olympus we can have whatever we want, whenever we want. Having to buy things or work for things or ask for things is an adjustment. But I’ve found that working for things, at least, can be very rewarding. That’s my favorite mortal lesson so far.)

Orion. Your one and only. What is it about your relationship that makes you so confident in forever?

Orion and I have so much in common, but we’re also different enough that we’re constantly surprising each other and challenging each other. I cannot express how much fun it is to go out on a hunt with him, crashing through the woods with our bows drawn—the excitement, the adrenaline, the sweat, the thrill, the danger. It’s intense. We love to eat well, we love to spin yarns and we could spend days just lying around talking about the past and our future. But Orion is also rash, where I’ve always been cautious and calculating. He makes decisions by his heart, while I tend to overthink things. We balance each other out on that. He can be selfish at times and cocky, which I find both infuriating and mind-bendingly attractive, but I try to reel him in when he lets his head swell. He thinks I can be too involved with my calling—too work obsessed—and is always looking for ways to distract me and help me stop and see the beauty in the world. I feel as if we’ll never get bored with each other. I can’t imagine my existence without him.

Your relationship with your mother, Aphrodite, is a bit contentious. Do you feel like this experience has made you closer in any way or are you just too different?

On Earth, I think that we’ve learned not to take each other for granted. She has always been my biggest advocate and defender, and I believe I stopped appreciating that when I got involved with Orion. I definitely appreciate it now. I think she has seen me as her errand girl for the last few centuries and hasn’t really recognized the value of the work I’ve done. Now I think she sees how difficult it is, forming true love, and how dedicated I am to our cause.

What’s one thing you learned from your interactions with people in New Jersey that you will apply to your relationships back home?

Great question! I’ve seen how important family is to Katrina and Charlie and it’s made me think about my relationship with my father and brothers. I’m close to my sister and even to my mom, though that can be, as you mentioned, complicated. But I hardly ever see my brothers, Phobus and Deimus, because they’ve sequestered themselves in their palace, and going over there can be very unpleasant. They’re so paranoid and jumpy all the time. But that’s no reason to avoid my own flesh and blood. And my father . . .  well, I have to accept the fact that he’s Ares. He’s never going to stop waging wars. But there has to be some aspect of him that’s redeemable, something I can love. I should be grateful for the fact that it would be virtually impossible for me to lose him the way Katrina lost her father. Maybe I’ll try to get to know him better. I feel like it would be disrespectful to Katrina and to the memory of the dad she loved so much, if I didn’t.

I really enjoyed getting to know Charlie and Katrina in book 1. Will readers be reuniting with them in the next book? (I hope so!)

Aside from Hephaestus, they’re pretty much my only friends at Lake Carmody High, so yes, they’ll be around. As long as I don’t do anything to mess things up!

Which celebrity romance do you find yourself shaking your head at right now?

I wish this whole Justin Bieber/Selena Gomez thing would fizzle already. Too many breakups are not a good thing. Also Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone. Love them both, but they almost never look happy when they’re together. Have you noticed that if they’re smiling, which is rare, the smile doesn’t extend to their eyes? That’s a major giveaway that something’s not quite right. Maybe if I could get in there and talk with them I could fix whatever’s going awry.

As someone responsible for so many love connections, what do you think is the most important part of keeping a relationship everlasting?

Honesty and trust are very important. You have to pick your battles, of course, and let the little things go. If you love someone, you shouldn’t nitpick every little thing that bothers you about them or your relationship, but if there’s a big issue, you must discuss it. Preferably in a calm and rational tone of voice at a point in the day when you’re not both stressed and/or exhausted. (So not during finals or after the senior lock-in.) It’s also important to keep things fresh, do the things you like to do together, and be there for each other, no matter what.

After all your… ahem, difficulty… getting settled on Earth, what’s one power from Mount Olympus that you wish you would have been allowed to bring with you?

When I first arrived, I would have said the power to read minds, because it would have made the matchmaking so much easier. But now I realize I never would have gotten to know Charlie and Katrina as well as I have if that power had been available to me. So I suppose I wouldn’t mind having the power to conjure things. Sometimes a girl just really needs a lipstick, or a headband, or, you know, a replacement cell phone for an awful jerk boy. Things happen.

ONLY EVERYTHING by Kieran Scott hits stores May 6, 2014. It’s the first book in the TRUE LOVE trilogy.
Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble
COMPLETELY NOTHING (Book 2) will be out September 20, 2014.

You’re in luck! Your chance to win a signed arc of ONLY EVERYTHING thanks to Kieran Scott! (Open to readers in U.S. and Canada; must be 13 years old or older to enter. Once the winner is notified, winner has 48 hours to respond or another winner is chosen.)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

April 23, 2014 - 10:15 am

Daphne - this is great! it sounds like a fantastic book & I want it now! :) i love a light-hearted mythology book.

April 22, 2014 - 8:03 pm

Danielle @ Love at First Page - I have been loving the fluffy contemporary YA books coming out this year, and glad to hear this is in the same vein!

But, mm, NOT happy about dissing Andrew and Emma! They are so cute together! Especially in interviews. <3

Estelle: Don’t Call Me Baby by Gwendolyn Heasley

DonDon’t Call Me Baby by Gwendolyn Heasley ( web | tweet )
Publication Date: April 22, 2014
Publisher: HarperTeen
Pages: 304
Target audience: Young adult
Key audience: parental relationships, the internet, friendship
Format read: ARC from Publisher via Edelweiss (Thanks!)

Summary: Imogene has been the subject of her mother’s popular blog, Mommylicious, since forever. As she starts 9th grade, she’s losing her patience with the staged outings, the products her mom wants her to review, and the people who recognize her when she’s out. So when her new English teacher assigns the entire class to starting up their own blogs, Imogene and her best friend, Sage, are determined to get back at their mothers with THE MOMMY BLOGGERS’ DAUGHTERS plan.

Reading Don’t Call Me Baby was an ironic experience. On one hand, I could totally understand where Imogene was coming from. She wanted her privacy; she didn’t want her mom to tell the world about every little thing going on with her. But on the other, as a blogger myself, I know there are so many positives experiences to come out of writing in your corner of the internet.

But Imogene’s mom definitely took blogging to a whole new level. I didn’t entirely blame her because she made a living by running her blog and had built quite a following. But she was distracted by her Mommylicious brand. She wasn’t sensitive to her daughter’s needs or even the needs of her mother (Grandma Hope) or her husband. She had a one track mind.

I’ll admit it, though. I can totally lose myself in my computer screen, and on my phone. To the point where I don’t even hear what the person next to me is saying. It’s not good. And it’s not something I’m proud of. But I have tried to put a cork in it, and be more conscious of how much time I’m spending around technology. That was one of the main themes of the Don’t Call Me Baby and in our internet-driven world, I appreciated it. Balance is so important when it comes to screen time vs. real life time. Imogene’s acting out had so much to do that, and her mother needed to take the time to realize this and do something about it.

Since Imogene was in ninth grade (and not yet officially in high school), the novel read a little young at points but I loved the friendship between Imogene and Sage (her mom also had a blog) and how their conspiring to take down their moms brings up a few conflicts between the two of them. They had a supportive, honest relationship and could lean on each other, but like any other friendship, they didn’t always agree with one another. And then there was Grandma Hope — a bright light and energetic gal who loved golf and didn’t understand the internet. She’s also gave Imogene the support she needed to be more honest with her mother.

From the authentic family dynamics to the commentary on the internet age, I had a great time reading Don’t Call Me Baby. While I had a few concerns about the logistics of the ending, the entire reading experience had me thinking about overexposure of children on the internet, the pros and cons of blogging (how dangerously easy it is to make your life look perfect), creating boundaries to ensure your life is about more than social media, and, most importantly, the delicate and tumultuous relationships between mothers and daughters.

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April 22, 2014 - 12:58 pm

Rachel - I really like your review of this book. I felt the same sense of irony reading the book as a blogger. Like yeah, I suppose it can get in the way of real life at times, especially if you’re neglecting the people you care about for your blog, but there are so many amazing things about blogging as well. But I definitely have to make a concentrated effort to stay present when I’m with friends (especially those that are non-bloggers), so I can understand where Imogene is coming from as well.

April 22, 2014 - 7:09 am

Amy @ bookgoonie - I know my kid reacts to every photo I take with “are you going to post that?”. Plus I get an eye roll everytime I ask the kiddo to give me a book sound bite. Though our kids don’t mind putting themselves out there, they don’t want us doing it for them.

April 21, 2014 - 4:18 pm

Maggie @ Just a Couple More Pages - You know I loved this story, I’m so glad you read it first and encouraged me to read it while reminding me that the character is much younger than the teens I normally read about. I agree that Imogene and Sage’s friendship was great and very true-to-life, I love how they argued, but then figured out a way to remain friends and grow their relationship.

April 21, 2014 - 12:05 pm

elena - i’m pretty curious about this because of the rise of mommy bloggers and the privacy concerns that are more prevalent these days. oh gosh, if i were imogene i would cringe so hard and feel like i have NO PRIVACY at all. people’s relationships w her via the internet must be so weird, esp because they see her grow up. yikes. kind of like how you feel you know a celeb but you really, really don’t.

April 21, 2014 - 11:56 am

Quinn @ Quinn's Book Nook - This seems really interesting. I am often sucked into the black hole of the Internet, too. I’ll definitely have to check out this book. Although I love blogging, I feel like I could really understand what Imogene would be frustrated with her life being on the Internet. It’s one thing if she was the one putting her life out there, but it was her mother. Although I haven’t read it yet, so I’m sure there is a lot more to it.

April 21, 2014 - 10:53 am

Molly @ wrapped up in books - I’ve been really interested in the crop of books that have come out recently about teens and internet culture. I can totally relate to you on the whole screen time/real life time balance. It can be difficult to strike! I’m also interested in friendship and family in YA.

Estelle: The Summer I Wasn’t Me by Jessica Verdi

Summer I WasnThe Summer I Wasn’t Me by Jessica Verdi ( web | tweet )
Publication Date: April 1, 2014
Publisher: SourceBooks
Pages: 352
Target audience: young adult
Keywords: family, obligation, homosexuality, “de-gaying” camp, summer
Format read: ARC from Publisher via NetGalley. (Thanks!)
Other RBR reviews by this author: My Life After Now

Summary: Lexi is primed and ready to focus on controlling her sexuality for the better of her family. She arrives at New Horizons ready to make this work. Even meeting the beautiful and smart Carolyn doesn’t deter her at first. But when the methods of the camp start to unveil herself, she starts to believe they have no idea what they are doing despite their shiny track record. Who will she be after the summer is over?

Where Verdi’s debut, My Life After Now, felt cumbersome, her latest was focused, more streamlined in subject matter — making it one of those books I rarely wanted to put down. Sentencing your character to a summer at a “de-gaying” camp is certainly a form of cruel and unnecessary punishment and it came as a surprise that Lexi, a teenager from a small town in South Carolina whose dad has recently passed away, was so open to it. She’s not kicking and screaming and her mom isn’t some scary villain. She believes she’s doing right by her child because of the uber-religious and small-minded town they came from.

Shockingly enough, I found Lexi’s attitude admirable. She was so focused on keeping her tiny family together (her mom was suffering a ton since the death of her husband), making life as “simple” as possible that she was prepared to give “de-gaying” her best shot.

She might not like the rules (having to forgo her wardrobe for a pink uniform, lights out super early) but she sure as hell was going to follow them. A high point of The Summer I Wasn’t Me was the cast of characters that Verdi assembled to be in Lexi’s group — shy and determined David, the gorgeous and dreamy Carolyn, and comic relief and rebel Matthew. As they experience intense therapy and role playing sessions together, this group, despite their backgrounds and hopes for “recovery,” need each other. New Horizons is not a place you can get through on your own, and I really enjoyed watching their friendships develop, especially as the mission of the camp grew more questionable.

While Matthew is suspicious of New Horizons from the get-go, it takes Lexi a little while to realize things might not be as they seem. But she is understandably torn. Her mom has paid just about $10K for her to attend this camp, and change — be the best hetero woman she can be — and Lexi is positive that her ability to stay straight will right the wrongs of her mom’s depression and make their family whole again. How can she choose between family and being true to who she is? Isn’t that selfish of her? (It’s even strange as a reader because you are rooting for her to get what she wants… even if it’s against nature.) I was impressed with Lexi’s self-control from the beginning, especially after she realized she was attracted to Carolyn but I also wasn’t surprised her focus wavered after being objectified to the camp’s horrific methods.

With her feelings for Carolyn growing stronger and her suspicions that New Horizons isn’t exactly as advertised in their promo material, Lexi is faced with even more complex emotions and decisions to make. Here’s the thing: I was riveted and already horrified about the subject matter in The Summer I Wasn’t Me up until this point and when a few massive reveals were made, I could not wait to see how they would be handled. This novel may have started out as a simple story — a girl willing to sacrifice herself for good of her family — but as you get deeper into the story, the complex situations and emotions were not given a chance to dig as deeper as I would have liked. The momentum was on par for so long, and, unfortunately, just dropped off at the end — causing the intensity to poof into thin air.

A lot of times I campaign for “a little more” at the end of books because I’m selfish and don’t want my time to be up with these characters but in this instance, to create such a heavy situation that deserved attention and development and not fully execute it? It was the difference between a good read and a fantastic one. I like Verdi’s writing (The Great Gatsby references in this were a highlight) and I was glad to see a lot of growth between her first book and her second but I’ll be curious for the time she conquers a story that is driven more by well-developed characters and earned emotions rather than by a situation.

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P.S. One book I truly loved that deals with this subject was The Miseducation of Cameron Post. SO SO good.

April 19, 2014 - 2:33 pm

Maggie @ Just a Couple More Pages - I think this review turned out really well. And you’ve made me want to borrow the book to figure out what the secrets are behind the camp. I also really like the distinction you made at the end between a character-driven story and a situation-driven story.

April 19, 2014 - 1:52 pm

Alexa S. - What interests me the most about The Summer I Wasn’t Me is the fact that Lexi was willing to go in the first place. I feel like I might be able to find myself rooting for her to get what would be best for her and her family.

April 18, 2014 - 6:58 am

Amy @ bookgoonie - Very interesting POV & actually one we hear a lot about on the news, but not fleshed out between the covers often.

April 18, 2014 - 12:19 am

Cassie G - I actually just received a copy of this in the mail and haven’t read it yet. Your review was wonderfully written, and I’ve not read anything by the author before, so I’m looking forward to seeing her style and management of characters in the book. And I’m definitely a fan of massive reveals! :)

Estelle: Life by Committee by Corey Ann Haydu

Life By Committee by Corey Ann HayduLife by Committee by Corey Ann Haydu ( web | tweet )
Publication Date: May 13, 2014
Publisher: Katherine Tegen/HarperTeen
Pages: 304
Target audience: Young adult
Keywords: secret relationships, online communities, friendship
Format read: ARC from Publisher via Edelweiss. (Thanks!)

Summary: Tabitha has been pretty lonely since her friends ditched her, citing her looks and interest in boys as reasons she has “changed”. Now, she has Elise and (secretly) Joe, a popular hockey player who has a serious girlfriend by day but tells Tabitha all his secrets at night. One day she stumbles on an online community called “Life By Committee.” It’s a safe place where she can divulge her most buried secrets and through “assignments” take control of her life. At first, Tabitha is inspired by this group, their drive, and feels empowered but when the assignments start to affect more of her world, she’s not sure what to think or how to get out.

Perfectly imperfect is how I like my book characters and Corey Ann Haydu delivers with Tab in Life By Committee. Not only is Tab a fan of Muppet music, a book lover to the extreme, and a totally normal teenager who helps her parents out with their cozy coffee shop in Maine, but, like any of us, she can’t help what she thinks, she doesn’t always make the wisest decisions, and she’s just trying to figure it all out.

Figuring it out includes a laundry list of things, by the way. Like why exactly her best friends turned totally petty and judgmental on her when she started getting into makeup and boys. (This doesn’t mean she stopped being a nerd.) Or why she can’t control her feelings for Joe, who makes her swoon every night with their online chats but still has a girlfriend. Or if her dad (Paul) can get it together and stop smoking up before her new sibling arrives?

As you can probably guess, Life By Committee pops up exactly when Tab feels like she has nowhere to turn. A small community of online “friends” she can admit her deepest and darkest secrets too? Who give her the courage and the extra push to move forward with what scares her the most? I mean, what can go wrong? Cue the foreboding music, friends.

All I could think of was Dawson during Season 1 of Dawson’s Creek as I got deeper and deeper into the book, and Tab got sucked further into LBC. (“My palms are sweating.” Except he was talking about Joey, and I was just freaking out about how this initial safe place turned wrong so fast.) To be a part of LBC, you divulge a secret and then are given an assignment by the LBC leader, Zed. In order to keep your secret a secret, you must complete the assignment or else.

At first, like Tab, I saw that assignments as something that would help another member seize the moment. But as the stakes were raised higher and higher, it was obvious the assignments would be affecting more than the LBC member but friends, family, reputations, and more. See? Scary stuff. I was internally freaking out about Tab and how she would exit the group without ruining absolutely everything, and stranded in a worse place than she started.

Even now, I feel incredibly anxious just thinking about it.

Life By Committee made me think a a lot about how we relate to others, and if we just see what we want to see. How could I not with the superficial reasons Tab’s friends had for dropping her? Or even how Tab felt for Joe. I wanted so badly to believe in Joe and think he was being real with her, that they had a future together. How secrets between friends and family members create such detachment that bridging it feels like climbing Everest. Or how loneliness and disconnect cause us to latch on to people and places, which provide no true help at all.

I was nervous to read LBC because Haydu’s OCD Love Story is one of the finest, most authentic debuts I’ve ever read. And I love that she created something so separate from her first book because the plotting and the characters are just as memorable but for different reasons. One thing she does continue to celebrate: the shades of gray that makes us human. We are not just ONE thing or ONE kind of way. Our thoughts, our actions, our feelings are constant changing, and we are not always going to do the right thing. Like someone asks in the book: “what if change were a comfort?” What if we weren’t so scared of it?

Even though it was very early into 2014 when I read LBC, the fact that it was so impossible to put down, the premise was so well-executed, and I related so much to Tab already secured it in my list of memorable years of the year. The writing is so fast-paced and at times so quote-worthy, I absolutely can’t wait to get a hard copy even if it means being a nervous wreck all over again reliving some of the most intense scenes I’ve encountered in YA.

So what am I saying? Haydu has officially made my auto-buy list. Also: read this.

Extra kudos: I love when a book cover fits the story absolutely so well. This is one of those circumstances.

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April 17, 2014 - 7:25 am

Ellie - I thought this cover looked familiar and then I remembered…I snagged an arc of this at ALAMW! And now you’ve completely convinced me that I need to move this up on my TBR pile. Imperfect characters are my jam.

April 17, 2014 - 12:07 am

Kelly @ Belle of the Literati - Oooh, this sounds so interesting!! You make me want to go request this right now!!

April 14, 2014 - 11:32 pm

Alexa S. - I AM SO EXCITED TO READ THIS! I haven’t read her first book (OCD Love Story), but I want to. And this one sounds even more delightful! And also thoughtful. So looking forward to it!

April 14, 2014 - 7:30 pm

Quinn @ Quinn's Book Nook - Whoa, your review got me all anxious, too! I do want to read this, though. I still haven’t read OCD Love Story. I think I need to remedy that ASAP.

April 14, 2014 - 2:02 pm

Maggie @ Just a Couple More Pages - I’ve been excited to read this one for the premise and since I liked OCD Love Story. However, I didn’t realize there was a whole threatening/foreboding part and that makes me less excited. I trust you that it’s well done, but so often I find those types of situations either too stressful or too cheesy. I have this one to review though and I’m still looking forward to reading it!

April 14, 2014 - 1:37 pm

Cassie G - I still haven’t gotten to this one yet, but I hadn’t actually read any reviews for it until yours! So glad to see you liked it. I am definitely adding this further up on my list of to-reads quickly. And I love when characters don’t always make correct decisions and they’re imperfect—we are too!
(And thanks SO MUCH for your lovely comments about my blog! I’m so glad you like it! It means a TON! :) )

April 14, 2014 - 1:35 pm

elena - AGH even reading the synopsis for this book is nerve-wrecking! i can def see how it’s appealing for tabitha (like you said, empowering) but omg there is a fine line between empowering and life-ruining. loved what you said about change. this really sounds like a great book!