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Magan: 52 Reasons to Hate My Father by Jessica Brody

Book Review for 52 Reasons to Hate My Father by Jessica Brody52 Reasons to Hate My Father by Jessica Brody
Publication Date: July 3, 2012
Pages: 352
Target audience: Young Adult.
Keywords: A-list celebrities, Inheritance, Daddy Issues
Format read: Borrowed from my local library.

Summary: Lexington is forced to work 52 jobs, assigned by her father, to prove she’s worthy of the inheritance she will be given if she successfully completes each job.

 

 

Let’s take a moment to characterize a few Hollywood starlets that have made magazine covers in the last 10-ish years for their terrible choices:

Britney Spears:

She SHAVED HER HEAD. By herself.
She accidentally married someone in Vegas.
Then there was the marriage to KFed. (Oops, she got married again?!)
She had a couple kids.
She flashed her underwear (or lack thereof) a whole lotta times.

And then she made a comeback and has lived a relatively “normal” life.

Linday Lohan:

She’s gotten in more car accidents than one can keep up with. (How does she still have a license?)
Someone could diagram her privates blindfolded because she’s so not careful when getting out of cars.
She’s always in trouble for drinking and drugs. Always. As in, hello, jail time. 

LiLo has not learned her lesson yet. The girl is still gettin’ in trouble.

So why am I giving you a breakdown of two Hollywood troublemakers? Because I need you to relate when I explain that Lexington, the main character in 52 Reasons to Hate My Father, is a Hollywood drama-seeker. She’s Lindsay and Britney’s bookish cousin. She’s spoiled, bratty, and overly obnoxious in the beginning of the book. All she wants is to inherit money from her dad when she turns 18 so she can live a comfortable, posh life and never have to depend on him again.

The problem with this flawless (*eye roll*) plan?

She can’t stay out of trouble. After she crashes her brand new, very expensive car into a convenience store, her dad makes her work 52 jobs – one for each week of the year – in order to gain her inheritance. Oh, poor Lexington.

I greatly admire Brody’s ability to turn unlikeable Lexi into a character I could relate to. She wasn’t someone I would even want to know in the beginning of 52 Reasons. Her attitude was very woe-is-me despite all the amazing things she had in her life. The one downfall was the lack of a relationship she had with her father. All of her magazine headlines were a cry for his attention. I appreciated the complexity of Lexi and her father’s relationship; I mostly thought the book would be a humorous display of Lexi’s failed attempts to work normal jobs.

While Lexi certainly didn’t fail to deliver lighthearted, funny moments, the jobs didn’t outweigh the underlying story of the abandonment Lexi felt after her mother died. Lexi learned to keep most people at a distance, except for her two best friends. While I didn’t trust that they would stick around when things got tough for Lexi, I was happily surprised that they weren’t the shallow girls I anticipated they would be.

There is a bit of a love interest, though I’ll be honest and say the relationship between Luke and Lexi doesn’t take center stage. Luke is hired by Lexi’s father to make sure she actually completes each of the jobs. Immediately, there air is thick between Luke and Lexi because she feels he’s her babysitter and he thinks she’s a spoiled brat. They say opposites attract, and boy, these two are certainly different in every way.

I hope you’ll enjoy 52 Reasons to Hate My Father as much as I did. I’m very much looking forward to checking out more of Brody’s work. (Isn’t that the best feeling when an author you like has more books to keep ya reading?!)

Goodreads | Amazon

November 22, 2012 - 1:30 pm

Alexa - I thought this book was really cute! I was surprised to see that there was certainly a lot more to it than just the whole DCOM vibe of these 52 crazy jobs that she had to do. I enjoyed it quite a lot, and am glad you did too.

November 22, 2012 - 1:03 pm

Kim @ Curious Tales of Modern Lore - Thank you for this review! I have been contemplating checking it out as a light read, but I have to admit that I tend to stay away from really girly, drama-filled titles. That being said, it seems that Lexi actually turns out to have some depth and growth, which I thoroughly enjoy seeing. I look forward to reading it.

November 22, 2012 - 5:00 am

VeganYANerds - Ha! Lexi sounds like an interesting and unlikeable character but that is all the more impressive if you ended up liking her! I’ll be sure to check this out Magan!

November 21, 2012 - 11:34 pm

Melissa @ Writer Grrl Reads - Great review! I have to admit, I rolled my eyes after reading the summary and thought that I’d give this one a miss, but your review actually made me give the book a second thought. It reminded me of a book that I read earlier this year (the title’s escaping me, but it’s written by the girls who wrote The Nanny Diaries), which was about a similarly spoiled starlet. Although I wasn’t enjoying the book that much, I couldn’t put it down either — for the same reasons, I supposed, that I ALWAYS reach for the trashy magazines in the grocery store line-up … “What has Britney/Lindsay/etc. done NOW?!?” It’s so bad, and so terrible, yet we just can’t turn away and we want more of the drama and the melt-downs and the craziness =P

November 21, 2012 - 12:45 pm

Aneeqah @ My Not So Real Life - Yay, I’m glad you enjoyed this one as well, Magan! I’ve been a huge fan of Jessica’s ever since I met her at a book festival. She is SO awesome and nice! But anyways, I loved how I could relate to someone who I thought was so unrelatable at first. It’s amazing how the author managed to bring some quality and relatable-ness into someone who is such a… brat. And I definitely enjoyed the daughter-father relationship that added some depth into this book.

Fantastic review Magan! <3

November 21, 2012 - 9:57 am

elena - This looks like a fun book! It is impressive when an author can take an unlikeable character and make them more relatable. I’ll try to see if they have it at my library next time!

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