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Magan: Wildflower by Alecia Whitaker

book cover of wildflower by alecia whitaker

Wildflower by Alecia Whitaker (twitter | website)
Publication Date: July 1, 2014
Publisher: Poppy
Pages: 320
Target Audience: Young Adult
Keywords: strong sibling relationships, female country singer, singer-songwriter
Format Read: ARC from Publisher (Thank you!)

Summary: Discovered in a small honky-tonk bar on the evening her father cannot lead their family band, Bird is quickly pulled into the singer/songwriter world. Her brothers, Dylan and Jacob, work through feelings of jealousy and abandonment, while her parents try to keep Bird grounded and safe. Bird works through all her feelings as she jots down ideas for songs about the boy, Adam, she’s been pining for over many miles on the road with the Barrett Family Band.

In the midst of a family crisis, Bird’s family manages to survive by clinging to music; they each choose an instrument, and eventually the Barrett Family Band is formed because they become so passionate about playing. They ditch the traditional brick and mortar lifestyle and travel around the country living in an RV — mom, dad, Jacob, Dylan, and Bird. In addition to the covers they play, Bird is a writer and occasionally they incorporate her songs into their set list. One fateful evening, Bird’s dad, Judd, is too ill to sing and lead the band so he asks Bird to step up and do so. Despite her initial nerves, she delivers a brilliant performance that attracts the attention of a big-name label, thus beginning the whirlwind experience of being signed and finding peace after feeling she’s abandoned her family band.

Bird is a typical sixteen-year-old-girl with a unique name and affinity for playing the fiddle. She’s close to her parents and siblings thanks to living in such close proximity to them in the RV; they’re her supporters and best friends. But that doesn’t mean they easily accept the big things that start to happen for Bird and they feel like their lives are set aside. And that doesn’t mean that when she starts to feel like she’s got a career she’s always accepting of the decisions her parents make on her behalf (because she feels she should be given some say-so). It does mean, however, that she’s got a pretty serious crush on a boy, Adam, who is a solo act they frequently see on the road (and oh, one of her brother’s best friends).

That she just so happens to have written a song about.

Bird is linked to a big songwriter, Shannon, who helps her learn how to better craft her songs into hits; Shannon’s daughter, Stella, quickly becomes one of Bird’s closest friends and was one of my favorite aspects of Wildflower. While Bird’s home life seemed very strong, I enjoyed the development of these friendships that were separate of her family. They demonstrated how Bird was a bright girl with a blossoming career, but showed how she was a young girl who needed her best friend’s help responding back to text messages from Adam or someone to complain to when her new career became overwhelming. (Because God forbid she complain at home and her family think she didn’t want the success or opportunity.)

Whitaker nailed the flow and pacing. My only complaint: I just wanted more. (Estelle even helped me search for news about a follow-up book.) The ending felt a little abrupt; there were a few situations with her record label and Adam that I felt were left hanging in limbo. Bird seemed to be working through a lot of emotions and trying to find her footing right before the book ended. Open-ended stories don’t bother me, but Bird seemed almost able to grasp where her career could take her and I wanted to experience that with her, as well as a bit of resolution. Wildflower cured my Nashville hangover (I’m addicted to the show — anyone else?) with every Bluebird, record label, honky-tonk reference. I flew through the pages and thoroughly enjoyed every bit of Bird’s whirlwind rise to fame.

But my one request: Alecia, I need more!

Update: BEST NEWS EVER:

alecia whitaker confirms wildflower seriesrather be reading worth it iconAdd Wildflower to Goodreads | Buy from Barnes & Noble | Buy on Amazon

June 24, 2016 - 10:40 am

Wildflower by Alecia Whitaker | Audiobook Review - […] Rather Be Reading – “nailed the flow and pacing.” […]

July 22, 2014 - 4:05 pm

Magan - Rosie, I’m so excited! I hope you read Wildflower and love it, especially since you’re a fan of Nashville. i think it’ll be perfect for you!

July 22, 2014 - 4:04 pm

Magan - Leah, I hope you’ve picked it up since reading my review. I hope you love it and give it a shot even though there’s obviously more of the story to come! xo

July 22, 2014 - 4:03 pm

Magan - April, I like the name Bird, too! I’m so glad you downloaded the book. I need to go scope your site out and see if you’ve read it yet! Can’t wait to see what you think. xo

June 25, 2014 - 7:16 am

April Books & Wine - I like the name Bird, seriously, I do.

I just downloaded Wildflower from one of those LB emails and I am so glad I did now. This books sounds like a me sort of book – in that there’s family and country music and record labels and siblings and I love ALL THOSE THINGS.

Also, I do not love books that don’t have solid endings but knowing there will be a sequel eases that.

June 25, 2014 - 6:37 am

Leah - Oh my gosh, Magan, this sounds wonderful!! How has this not shown up on my radar until now?! This is SUCH a Leah book!

🙁 That’s disappointing about the ending though. A few months ago I read a novel that felt like it was missing the last few chapters..it simply ended in the middle of a scene. Talk about abrupt!

June 25, 2014 - 2:46 am

Rosie - I love Nashville, currently working my way through the end of series 1, so this sounds right up my street. Looking forward to getting my paws on this.

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