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Of Survival and Discovery | #SoRatherBeYoung

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Back in December, Hannah from So Obsessed With and I decided to start a laidback feature where we introduce each other to favorite books of our childhood and joint read another. Well, we have certainly taken the laidback part of this feature to a whole new level. (Let’s blame a broken computer, summer, and life!) That being said, yay for the next installment of You Make Me Feel So Young. (Have you seen the new Geico commercial where they sing this song?)

Let’s get the ball rolling, shall we?

Island of Blue Dolphins Summary Tweet

Joint pick: Island of Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell | First published in 1960

More Than You Know: Scott O’Dell founded an award for historical books for children in 1982. If you are a lover of this genre, definitely check out the list of past winners. This year’s was Dash by Kirby Larson.

Memories Are Made of This: All I remember about reading this book when I was itty-bitty was that I devoured it — which is a little shocking because books with very little dialogue and so, so much nature are not really my thing now.

Second Time Around: I couldn’t stop thinking about how Island of Blue Dolphins was a precursor to dystopians like The Hunger Games. This young girl is forced to find ways to survive for herself, and all alone — not for a game, not for the entertainment/punishment of the government. (I’m sure I would fee this way about Lord of the Flies too.) That being said, I forgot how sad and quiet this book was. It was, though, remarkable to watch her drive build up even during the darkest times. Yay for a strong female lead.

You Can Take My Word for It, Baby: I would have no problem with my future children picking this book up, but my one fear is that dystopians are canceling out classics like this one. (I don’t have anything to back this statement up but I could see why kids want to pick up a shiny cover over something like this.) Otherwise, I can definitely see this book looking so well in not only a lit class but how about a history as well?

The Secret Garden Summary Tweet

Hannah’s pick for me: The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Do You Know Why? “When I was talking to Estelle about the books of my childhood, I realized that many of my favorites are classics. But which one was I going to make her read? Since our discussion was initially taking place during the spring, I wanted to choose a book that fit the season. And that’s what inspired The Secret Garden! Mary Lennox (who truly is “quite contrary” in the beginning) experiences so much growth, which makes this book a great character-driven read. I was hoping Estelle would be transported by the magic of the story!” — Hannah

Can’t You Just See Yourself: I am the worst at reading classics. I always promise myself it will happen, and nope nope nope. I avoid it a lot. I’m so mad at myself for waiting to read The Secret Garden (for the record, my old coworker lent me her copy 2 years ago and that’s the copy I read for this project). It started off a little slow especially because Mary was such a brat (not surprised) and then really picked up as she fell in love with her freedom outside and all the possibilities at Misselthwaite Manor.

I Give You My Word: Definitely a book I would pass along to the future kids of the world. I can only imagine the discussions of literary devices, symbolism, and even art projects that could supplement the reading of The Secret Garden.

Before the Music Ends: My mission for you: find a beautiful version of this book and read it as soon as you can. Though some of the dialogue hasn’t aged as graciously with time, it’s a delightful read about many different walks of life finding second chances and blossoming once again. I’m so glad Hannah convinced me to read it. (Now I’m ready to read The Little Princess!)


What’s the last book you picked out of your “vintage” bookshelf?

We’d love to hear! Be sure to check out Hannah’s SOBY post today too!

Stay tuned for next month (we promise!) when Hannah & I joint read: Wayside School Gets a Little Stranger by Louis Sachar! #SoRatherBeYoung

November 5, 2015 - 10:34 am

Emma @ Miss Print - Confession: Scott O’Dell is one of a handful of authors where I soundly dislike all of his books–something I discovered as a kid. It was one of the first times I realized that the way some authors write just might not work for every reader.

It’s interesting to me that you were not a classics reader as a kid. That’s basically all I read aside from mysteries that I shared with my mom (like Lillian Jackson Braun) and some children’s books I’d pick myself at the library (but those often were classics too) until I discovered YA as a teen working in the library.

I don’t know that I loved The Secret Garden (I liked A Little Princes just a bit more) but I remember enjoying it. It’s one title my mom and I would read together before I went to bed when I was little. Such memories!

October 27, 2015 - 12:32 pm

Alexa S. - I have so much love for this feature, and the way that you both are drawing attention to some great classics! I loved both Island of the Blue Dolphins and The Secret Garden as a little girl. I have yet to reread them as an adult, but I will always have fond feelings associated with both. Happy to see how much you enjoyed them, E!

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Good morning (good day) to you and you and you

Hi, how are you?!

I’m trying something new over here this morning. (Actually, it’s Sunday night and I’m watching The Talking Dead and trying not to feel devastated.) So hello. Hope your weekend was excellent. I caught up with an old, amazing friend, stuffed myself with lovely biscuits and grilled cheese, actually sat down to watch a movie (Love & Mercy — so good), and made a beer & cheddar soup. (God, I had a lot of cheese this weekend.) I even FaceTimed with my mom — which is a rare feat because she works a lot.

Good Things Are Going to Happen

More positive thoughts at The Berry.

The big/shocking news: October is over in less than a week. What is happening with this year? I can’t even understand the speed in which it has been moving. I’m starting to get anxious like HAVE I DONE ENOUGH WITH MY YEAR or DO I HAVE ENOUGH TIME LEFT TO DO [FILL IN THE BLANK]? The half-full answer, of course, is YES TOTALLY and the half-empty answer is OMG AM I THE ONLY ONE WHO HASN’T STARTED CHRISTMAS SHOPPING? It’s fine, I’m good. I just want to be really present in enjoying the rest of the year. (Is this the yoga talking?)

So what am I reading? I just finished I Crawl Through It by A.S. King, which was energizing as a reader because the format and writing was so different. I love how King takes chances with her book and makes me say wtf a lot. Next up? I’m dying to jump into a romance but until I find one I feel like reading, I decided to check out Young Widows Club by Alexandra Coutts. Another unique concept (17-year old widow!?) with a more straightforward approach. The book hits shelves on November 10.

Library Haul October 25

Latest from the library: The Last Love Song by Tracy Daughtery; All American Boys by Jason Reynolds & Brendan Kiely; The Borrowers by Mary Norton.

What am I looking forward to this week? Hitting the half-way point with #30DaysofYoga — had a few hiccups this month but I’m sticking with it and loving it. A new episode of The Muppets on Tuesday — hooray! THE WORLD SERIES IS STARTING. I might not be an Mets fan but I think this series is going to be so, so juicy and great plus I have a thing for Mr. Met. (I’m not looking forward to the train situation in Queens on Friday though.) And… my husband might be getting his BAR EXAM results this week. Eek, I’m trying not think about it so pretend I didn’t say anything.

Here’s a little procrastination when you need it: I’ve been having SUCH trouble getting up in the mornings since the weather got cooler so I’m taking some advice from this Bustle article and using a song as my alarm. (Fingers crossed!) Cried on the subway listening to Death Sex & Money’s interview with an astronaut who lost his wife in the Columbia explosion. I can’t imagine my mom picking out my clothes for a week, but this Marie Claire editor let her mom dictate her style (even her hair!) and it makes for such a great read!

Let’s have a productive week, shall we? Let’s not deny ourselves a caffeine boost or dark chocolate at 2pm, okay? – e

October 27, 2015 - 3:56 pm

Alexa S. - I love this post, E! Glad to hear things are going well for you <3 And there's still plenty of time to get your Christmas shopping done, and to do some more of the things that you want to do before the year ends! Hope you find a good romance to read :)

October 26, 2015 - 1:49 pm

Molly | wrapped up in books - I need to read the new A.S. King. I also just checked out All American Boys from the library (along with like 10 other books, but it’s near the top of the list…)

Have a great week!

October 26, 2015 - 10:09 am

Leah - (and if you find a romance worth reading, pass it along my way! I’ve been in the mood for a swoony read lately!)

October 26, 2015 - 10:08 am

Leah - I actually LOVE the idea of having someone pick out my clothes for me! My mom and my sisters have the most amazing fashion sense so I know they’d rock my wardrobe (or – fingers crossed – they’d end up picking things from their own closets for me!) I’ve been seeing a lot of articles lately about moms letting their toddlers dress them and I think some of the results are adorable…BUT I think it helps to already have a fab set of clothes to begin with. Netflix recently added a documentary about Iris Apfel and since watching it I’ve been taking risks with my clothes, mixing up patterns and colors, pairing items I never had considered before. I’m having a blast with it so far!

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Pageants, Potter, and a Creek | Capeside Revisited

There’s this scene in the first season of Dawson’s Creek. Joey Potter, “the too-tall girl from the wrong side of the creek”, enters a stage behind a line of girls who are smiling with their teeth and wearing sequin-y dresses. Joey’s dress is sleek and simple. Her hair, which normally sits on her shoulders and behind her ears, is swept up in a bun. She’s wearing brown lipstick and instead of smiling big, she does the side smile. It’s a little shy, a little serious, and a little like “what the heck am I really doing up here”. With the fluttery plinks of music in the background, Joey walks on that stage among a crowd of people who are undoubtably judging her but, in the back of the room, her best friend adjusts a camera. He even nudges the camera guy out of the way to truly focus. Because after years of friendship awe falls across his face. Could this be? Is this the Joey Potter he always knew? Suddenly, everything has changed.

This moment solidifies so many of the reasons I connected with this show since its premiere in 1998. I was in 8th grade. I might not have been in love with my best friend or being raised by my older sister in a home where nothing came easy. But I was a girl who preferred the background over centerstage, who chose a book over running around outside every time. Someone who wanted to be accepted by her friends and applauded for working so hard all the time. Someone on the cusp of being discovered in one way or another.

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Because the show just happened to run from 8th grade until the May I graduated high school, it feels so much a part of my blossoming, a constant when everything felt so fragile and confusing.  I was a pretty well-behaved kid who listened to her parents but when it came to TV, I was not much for boundaries. When news of the Dawson’s Creek premiere started to hit papers, my mom was pretty adamant about me not watching. TOO MUCH SEX AND BIG WORDS. But I snuck watched it anyway and never turned back. (My mom eventually got over this. In fact, after all these years, it’s surprising to me that my 90210/Vampire Diaries loving mother never got into the show herself.)

When life got overwhelming with friends, band practice, after-school jobs, and boys, at least I had my Tuesday or Wednesday night to sit around with these characters and completely unwind. It was my time. I closed the door, sat crosslegged on my fringe rug (until my parents put down wood floors in my junior year of high school), sipped from a can of soda and let myself be thrown into the lives of four people who I practically grew up with. I probably didn’t think much about it then but the show introduced me to teenagers dealing with mental illness, coming out for the first time, slut shaming, and struggling so much to feel settled in the decisions they made and the love they were feeling.

To rev up for this post, I rewatched a few episodes of the show this past weekend and there’s another Joey scene that really got me. She’s sitting in Pacey’s car, after a surprising and surreal weekend and she announces maybe she’s not meant to find happiness. “I’m 16-years old and in my entire life there have been two people who know me!” I’m 30 so it’s ironic to hear her say “entire” in regards to 16 years on this planet. She’s so scared the weekend she had is some indication that she’s doomed forever. I can totally sit here and comment on how dramatic she sounds (it will be okay, Joey!) but isn’t this how we all felt back then? Like when the hell will my real life begin? When will everything fall into place?

Over six years, Dawson’s Creek managed to scramble the pieces of these characters in such a way that we saw no combination could be permanent. Anything could change at any moment (even if you’re enjoying an ice cream cone and singing along to a James Taylor copycat in your car) and that doubt that seems larger than life when you are a kid dissipates. Not because you’re suddenly mega-confident in a perfect, grown-up life but because there are truly less moments to share this kind of honesty. And maybe, just maybe, age welcomes a bit more faith and the understanding that one solid step forward means there are plenty of shaky ones in between.

Now that I’m the owner of so much wisdom (har har har), I wish I could tell the girl who rewound (yes, rewound) the pageant episode of Dawson’s Creek to rewatch time and time again that her yearning to feel brave, protected, and accepted is going to pop up frequently. That she might still think Dawson and Joey belonged together in the beginning, but she’s also open to what feels right and knows it’s okay to change her mind. She’d be really confused about Tom Cruise marrying Katie Holmes, but not surprised that Joshua Jackson remains devilishly good-looking and is still acting (even if she doesn’t watch any of his shows). And that in the age of Jimmy Fallon (“who?” says 14-year old me) there’s always the opportunity for a reunion.

Because true love never, ever dies. (Even if the soundtrack changes.)

Capeside Revisited Dawson

Big thanks to Rachel for asking me to be a part of this appreciation week!

One other thing to be thankful for when it comes to the creek: her friendship. We met over a shared love of the show, both ran our own fansites, and found out we were from the same town. The rest is history!

October 22, 2015 - 2:06 pm

Jessica @ Strung out on Books - Omg this post gave me so many feelings! I’ve only seen about half of the first season, even though I’ve tried time and again to watch this show. Some other new show or book would end up distracting me and I’d forget for a while and have to restart season one. But after reading this I’m convinced that I need to continue watching. This was such a touching post! :)

October 22, 2015 - 12:01 am

On Dawson's Creek and Love Triangles [Capeside Revisited] - Mostly YA Lit - […] Chelly: Pacey + Joey Meets YA Rather Be Reading: Pageants, Potter and a Creek Andi’s ABCs: The ABCs…Dawson’s Creek Style Little Wing Books (coming […]

October 20, 2015 - 11:51 am

Alexa S. - I love this post, E! It’s so lovely, the way you’ve framed your look back at the show. Even though I didn’t experience Dawson’s Creek exactly the same way, I still think about the show with the same sort of nostalgia. <3

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Slappy birthday & memory returns

Months and months before her birthday, one of my long-time best friends (ironically a non-reader) knew she wanted to see the Goosebumps movie as part of the festivities for her big 3-1. All the cool kids were reading R.L. Stine’s books back in the day. Including us.

The movie was actually a lot better than I thought. It was well-written and had a great mix of sweet and scary. Though, I sure hope no one thinks R.L. Stine is some sort of recluse sitting around his house with a daughter he never lets see the light of day but, all in all, I got a kick out of the recognizing book details from way, way back.

After reading this article by reporter Brian Stelter about his late-90s Goosebumps fansite, I was reminded of a little project I embarked on with the aforementioned birthday girl and another one of our besties (who was also sharing popcorn with us this weekend). In our fifth grade class, our computer time was limited to a CD-Rom of the encyclopedia. I don’t even think I had an AOL username at that point (my dad was really strict about screen time). We weren’t constantly being fed information. We had to find it in teen magazines and newspapers and the actual news. As a kid, I loved reading the newspaper — unsurprisingly, the Arts and Entertainment section. Who knows what it was that inspired me to head my own newspaper back then with my two friends as co-editors, but I did. We shared upcoming movies, there was an advice column, we created themed word searches, and even included addresses to write to our favorite celebrities. It’s funny now to think about the book news we reported on. Without checking websites (and before the term ‘blogger’ even existed), my friends and I used to call Scholastic for the upcoming titles of our beloved Babysitters Club and Goosebumps books. They were always gracious and gave them to us. Even then, it felt special to be “in the know” and be the source sharing the great news with our friends.

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It’s crazy how little pieces of our childhood factor into the adults we become, isn’t it?

Books remain a constant in my life. My work. My play. My escape. My relief. My fun. The fandom I felt when reading Stine’s and Ann M. Martin’s books has continued to stick with me until now, whether it’s reading voraciously or sharing my recommendations with some kind of “crowd.” (My favorite thing to do was switch off with a Babysitters Club book and then a Goosebumps. Even then, I was strategic about my palette cleansers!)

So I guess the Goosebumps movie did what it was supposed to do. It made me remember and realize fandom never goes away — it just takes on different forms as a person grows and as the world advances. I wonder how many 30-somethings went home from the movies this weekend and bought some used Goosebumps books. (I bought 4.)

October 27, 2015 - 1:52 pm

Emma @ Miss Print - I don’t really have a lot to say but I loved this post. It reminded me fondly of the BSC books I owned from Scholastic book fair (numbers 1 through 55 for sure if not more!) and the odyssey I dragged my mom on (at least two toy stores) to get my Claudia BSC doll which I still own.

It’s funny how as children we often find things that don’t even have names when we discover them. I didn’t have a newspaper as a kid but I wrote a couple of epic thinly veiled remixes of . . . Emily of New Moon and A Wizard of Earthsea. I think of them as my first and only attempts at fan fiction.

October 20, 2015 - 3:25 pm

Alexa S. - I loved reading Goosebumps and many other series as a child! They’re definitely a big part of my life, even until now, and I love that. I love that books still remain at the forefront of things important to me, and I love that other people feel the same way. Loved reading this, E!

October 20, 2015 - 9:24 am

Leah - Matt isn’t a reader. At all. Yet he is passionate about Goosebumps. I was (and still am) massively in love with reading and gobbled up practically everything I could get my hands on as a child…apart from Goosebumps. For some reason I was never interested in reading them despite my friends’ love for the series. A few years ago Matt had a cold and was convinced he needed to be on bedrest (men..) Being the wonderful girlfriend I am, I grabbed him a few Goosebumps novels – being sick is the PERFECT time for comfort reads. Not long after I was sick and wanted something to read, but didn’t want to put much thought or effort into it. LONG STORY SHORT, I grabbed one of the books (it was the one about lawn gnomes!) and had a blast.

I’m a decade or two late to the party BUT I can finally say I’ve read a Goosebumps book and I’ve been grabbing them any chance I get!

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Wall to Wall Creeps | Pub Date

Pub Date Header

I am not the best at the Halloween-ish themes.

What creeps me out? Sometimes the dark? My parent’s basement. The OUIJA board. Ghosts (oh, I totally think they are real.) Pigeons (one flew into my face today). BLOOD. (When I was little, I once told my aunt I wanted to be a nurse and she was like YOU HAVE TO LIKE BLOOD, YA KNOW.) Mannequins. It’s true! Their faces can be so blank. I’m sure I have more items to add to this strange list but I’ll let you mull these over for now.

My plans to see Goosebumps in the movies this weekend totally inspired this post’s direction. I couldn’t think of anything I’d read lately that creeped me out so why not go back in time and talk about those. While R.L. Stine’s series was no Babysitters Club in my world, I was pretty addicted to these stories for awhile (my whole class was). My favorite will always be Ghost Beach. (I wonder if it’ll be mentioned in this new flick.)

But BEFORE that, I was loving Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz. One of my friends at the time had copies at home and I remember reading the stories over and over again. The ones in our library were never available because this book was so dang popular. I’m actually surprised (or should I be) that these books are banned in some schools. Unless my imagination is playing games with me, I remember our teachers reading these outloud to us. Did you know there’s a documentary being made about the series?

Another fun little memory from my childhood was the big “grown up” 5th grade trip to Washington, D.C. I bought a book of ghost stories at one of the monument gift shops (was it Jefferson?) and my roommates and I stayed up so late reading them, totally freaking ourselves out. I was so exhausted the next night I was SURE the Abe Lincoln monument was blinking at me. For some unknown reason, I gave the book away but I recently bought my own: Ghosts: Washington’s Most Famous Ghost Stories. I need to dig this one out.

So while you’re sitting in a dark room with a Pumpkin Apple candle burning, I’m recommending Saranac’s OctoberFest (NY) for another kind of “spirit”. It’s your basic German lager and goes down well with pizza or all the candy you’re attempting to hoard for the big trick or treating day. It’s uncomplicated and cozy, and a great beer for the brew rookies out there.

Pub Date for Creepy Books

Enjoy the fall weekend, dears! (Someone remind me to watch Hocus Pocus!)

And thanks for stopping by! xoxo

Pub Date: Brittany @ Book Addict’s Guide | Andi @ ABC’s | Maggie @ Just a Couple More

October 17, 2015 - 8:32 pm

Catherine - I love scary books – not gory, but scary. If you are afraid of pigeons, you should read The Seven Wicked Pigeon Ladies in the Garden by Mary Chase. I loved that book when I was young and love it still. It made me look at pigeons in a whole new light.

http://buildinglifelongreaders.blogspot.com/2015/09/throwback-thursday-wicked-pigeon-ladies.html

October 16, 2015 - 11:43 am

Brittany @ The Book Addict's Guide - How fun!! I love your throwback book selection. Most of my class loved Goosebumps too but I never read those! I actually started reading R.L. Stine’s Fear Street instead which were way scarier haha! I actually gave myself nightmares and finally my mom was like, “Well you’re getting nightmares because of those books.” Either I ran out of books or decided to stop reading them because hey, I stopped at some point in time.
Mmmm Octoberfest! Those are usually a safe bet with me!

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Dive Into Diversity Family Series: Single-Parent Families

Dive Into Diversity Reading Challenge

Recently I found myself having a conversation with someone about how thankful I am for my husband, Dustyn. He broadens our daughter, Everett’s, horizons in ways I never thought possible — he shows her and teaches her things that don’t come naturally to me. He’s giving her something different that I couldn’t or wouldn’t think to. It dawned on me while I was talking to this friend that not everyone has both parents to influence parts of their personality, interests, and being. That seems like such a simple realization, but it really struck me.

Nearly 25,000,000 children in the United States live in a single-parent family according to Kids Count Data Center. Those children represent 26% of those living in our country, which means nearly one in four people reading this post likely come from a single-parent home. Divorce and death are something I’ve felt very far-removed from because I didn’t personally know many people my age who were living through this. But that’s all changed in the last few months; I’ve had four friends get divorced, three of which had children. I now see how gray some areas are and how everything isn’t so easily black and white. A few factors that separate families include abuse, death, military deployment, or the parents were never wed before having children and parted ways.

According to the Encyclopedia of Children’s Health, “The most common type of single-parent family is one that consists of a mother and her biological children. In 2002, 16.5 million or 23 percent of all children were living with their single mother. This group included 48 percent of all African-American children, 16 percent of all non-Hispanic white children, 13 percent of Asian/Pacific Islander children, and 25 percent of children of Hispanic origin. However, these numbers do not give a true picture of household organization, because 11 percent of all children were actually living in homes where their mother was sharing a home with an adult to whom she was not married. This group includes 14 percent of white children, 6 percent of African-American children, 11 percent of Asian/Pacific Islander, and 12 percent of Hispanic children.”

So where does that leave us in our quest for more diverse books? Are one in three of the books you’re reading inclusive of a single-parent family? Let’s take a look at some books that have incorporated this really well…

Single-Parent-Familiy-Books-Featuring-Single-Mothers

Not Otherwise SpecifiedSince You’ve Been GoneThe Last Time We Say Goodbye • I’ll Meet You There

What I Thought Was True • We Were LiarsAll the Rage

Single-Parent-Familiy-Books-Featuring-Single-Fathers

Promposal • To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before • On the FenceIf I Lie

I’d like to note that it was a bit more difficult to find single-father books to share, which made me curious about the rise of single-fathers. According to Pew Social Trends, nearly one quarter of single-parent families are run by a single-dad and the number has been steadily climbing over the years.

• • •

What books have you read that include examples of single-parent families? 
What would you like to read more of regarding families?




October 21, 2015 - 9:16 am

Rebecca @ Reading Wishes - Great post. I haven’t ever intentionally sought out YAs with single parent households, but considering the statistics, it’s a surprise they’re not being represented more. I’ve only read two of the books you mention, but I thought To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before was handled great.

October 13, 2015 - 12:36 pm

Emma @ Miss Print - Great round up!

As one of those people who comes from a single parent household I think about this a lot (and if I’m being honest, have a lot of baggage from it as well). The project is stalled out for a lot of reasons but one of the things I really, really wanted to be sure to have in the project I’m working on right now is a single-parent protagonist because it’s not shown that much.

I also wish it was shown as more commonplace and not always as part of some greater assortment of obstacles that the MC has to face throughout the novel. And also I wish more books had single family households where the absent parent isn’t dead or a deadbeat. Sometimes they just aren’t a part of the family unit. And that’s okay and reality, you know?

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