Rather Be Reading » A Young Adult Book Blog by Two Busy Girls Who Always Find Time For a Book

Masthead header

Why in 5: Not in the Script by Amy Finnegan

Not in the Script by Amy Finnegan

Not in the Script by Amy Finnegan (twitter | website)
Publication Date: October 7, 2014
Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s
Pages: 272
Target Audience: Young Adult
Keywords: best friends growing apart, life of an actress, filming a TV series
Format Read: ARC from Publisher (Thank you!)

Summary: Emma loves acting and knows there’s nothing else she’d rather do, but she wishes that people could look beyond her celebrity status to see the real her. Even her best friend, Rachel, seems wrapped up in her fame. When Emma begins filming Coyote Hills, she has an instant connection with Jake, her co-star, but she tries to maintain a friends-only relationship with him.

  1. Maturity. The characters are college-aged and Emma, the main character, is particularly thoughtful and mindful of how her actions will affect other people. I loved that she tried to think things through before acting on impulse, but there were times she still found herself in uncomfortable situations.
  2. Friendships. Two points here — Emma’s best friend, Rachel, revels in Emma’s success; she’s jealous and very passive aggressive. It’s clear, even to Emma, that their friendship isn’t working anymore. It’s never easy to make the decision to move on, but I think that was handled really well here. Rachel is also “in love” with Jake based on the modeling photographs she’s seen of him; Emma feels like he’s off-limits to her (though their connection is so strong) because she wants Rachel to have something since her own acting career isn’t working out. What this leads to is Emma and Jake forming this awesome friendship; yes, there’s amazing tension and yes, we see Rachel is terrible so we root for Emma just to GO FOR IT, but as I mentioned in bullet point #1, they’re mature.
  3. A not-so-cheesy look into an actress’s life. I admit that I’ve read a few books about celebrities and actors. And many of them have felt a little too inauthentic. They skimmed the surface, but didn’t dive into the details. Not in the Script shows how Emma battles with her mom-turned-manager, how misleading the gossip magazines can be, and how everyone is looking out for themselves. Emma seems like the most NORMAL girl who happens to be a celebrity. She’s good at what she does, but it doesn’t define who she is. (Except that this is how most people see her, as a celebrity, and she wants people to look beyond that.)
  4. Great secondary cast. Kimmi, Brett, and Jake are Emma’s other co-stars in the television show they’re filming, Coyote Hills. McGregor is their director who reads people extremely well, doesn’t handle drama well, and keeps them all in check. Kimmi appears to be the biggest drama queen, seems to maybe be the cause for paparazzi showing up in unexpected places, but often gives Emma solid advice. Brett chases Emma, but doesn’t pick up on the clues that she’s not reciprocating the love-fest. Perhaps best of all is Jake’s mom, who suffered from a stroke, and connects well with Emma. She doesn’t see Emma as a Big Celebrity.
  5. Perfect balance. Not in the Script isn’t a light and fluffy read, but it’s not crazy heavy and overwhelming either. One thing is guaranteed, you’ll be drawn to keep reading to see if Emma and Jake finally give into the feelings they both so strongly have for each other. You’ll want to know what happens with Rachel, and you’ll want to smack Brett because the poor guy just can’t take a hint. (PS — don’t judge this book by the cover, which I interpreted to be a lot fluffier than the book actually was.)

rather be reading worth it icon

Add Not in the Script to Goodreads | Buy from Amazon | Buy from Barnes & Noble

October 8, 2014 - 11:21 pm

Alexa S. - I’m really looking forward to reading Not in the Script! It sounds like it’s going to be such a treat, especially since Emma sounds like an amazing main character. I love that she comes across as a genuinely GOOD character, one who’s mature and smart and talented. Can’t wait to read it!

October 6, 2014 - 7:57 am

Nicole @ The Quiet Concert - I really like the sound of this from your review. I haven’t read any books in the If Only series (although I know they are not a series in the traditional sense) and I think I’ll start with this one. I want to read more books with college-aged MCs and I like the acting plotline (among other things) Great review :)

October 2, 2014 - 9:23 am

Kim - I couldn’t I agree with you more! I loved this book so much!

October 1, 2014 - 4:23 pm

Valerie Pennington - I absolutely adored this novel and I think that you captured all the reasons that I loved it. Great review.

October 1, 2014 - 12:19 pm

Amy Finnegan - So . . . I’m just gonna pull up a chair and spend my day reading this review over and over again. You good with that? Excellent :)

THANK YOU!!! xoxo

Back to Top|Subscribe via RSS|Subscribe by Email

Top Ten Tuesday: Tough Subject Books

I’m pretty drawn to tough subject books. I scoured my Goodreads lists and narrowed it down to these FIFTEEN tough subject books instead of ten. (Bonus reads!) Obviously I didn’t follow the rules very well. Some of these were harder than others, but they all have aspects of them that really open your eyes to some difficult-to-discuss topics. If you have recommendations for me, I’d love to know what you suggest I add to my TBR.

I broke these down into a few topics and added brief notes for why they were difficult. No spoilers included. All links go to either a review on Rather Be Reading or Goodreads so you can check out the summaries.

BULLYING:

young adult books about bullying recommendation

  1. Rites of Passage — bullying, sexism, hazing
  2. Tease — teen suicide, bullying
  3. If I Lie — knowing the secret truth about characters, bullying, ass-hat father
  4. Some Girls Are — bullying. bullying. bullying. stupid high school.

 

CIRCUMSTANCES & RELATIONSHIPS:

young adult books with difficult topics, circumstances, and uncomfortable relationships

  1. The Tragedy Paper — albino character, seclusion, longing after an unavailable girl
  2. Ketchup Clouds — written to a prisoner, hidden identity of main character
  3. The Lucy Variations — uncomfortable relationship with an adult, parents dictating every move
  4. When You Were Here — loss of a parent, misuse of prescription pills, loss of sense of self
  5. Small Town Sinners — discovering one’s own religious beliefs apart from what parents have taught you to believe
  6. Room — being held hostage, abuse, kidnap, written from the POV of a 5 year old

 

SEX / ABUSE / PREGNANCY:

young adult books about sex, mental and sexual abuse, and pregnancy

  1. Where the Stars Still Shine — mental/emotional abuse MC suffered from mother’s instability
  2. Please Ignore Vera Dietz — implicit sexual fetish, death of a friend, crumbling friendship
  3. Me, Him, Them, & It — teen pregnancy + working through the decision to keep, abort, or give up the baby for adoption
  4. Uses for Boys — language + actual way it was written, but also sexually explicit, borderline uncomfortable for me — sex isn’t described as overly poetic and is raw and often very in-your-face
  5. Live Through This — sexual abuse by a relative, mental instability of the MC who questions right from wrong

 

 ↔

Which of these books was most difficult for you to read?
What tough subject book recommendations do you have for me?

October 8, 2014 - 11:19 pm

Alexa S. - These books do cover some tough subjects! I do think it’s important though, because sometimes people feel so alone in these situations – and these books might remind them that they aren’t alone. I got reminded of a few titles I’ve been meaning to check out, so thanks for putting the list together!

October 6, 2014 - 8:02 am

Nicole @ The Quiet Concert - I too am drawn to tough subject books and thought i’d read a decent amount of them so I’m surprised that I’ve only read two on this entire list (but good surprised as I have more recommendations). I definitely want to read Rites of Passage since I’ve been seeing that around a lot lately and it has a military theme which we don’t get all that often. When You Were Here is also at the top of my list. Thanks for sharing!

October 3, 2014 - 8:35 am

Jamie - SO spot on for the ones out of this list I’ve read! Rites of Passage had me LITERALLY shaking it was so hard to read how she was treated and just knowing they were getting away with that crap. OH MY GOD. I still feel a fit of rage coming on thinking about it. Loved that book so hard though! Some Girls Are was really hard too..I remember being physically shaken by it. I was reading it on vacation (in the bathtub and literally finished the whole thing — after being in a house with my sister’s kids for a week I just wanted to escape haha) and I just remember thinking how scared I was for Genevieve to grow up. Because this bullying thing, to me at least, seems way worse than when I was a kid…unless Ijust didn’t see it or experience it.

September 30, 2014 - 8:39 pm

Magan - Amanda, I DEFINITELY AGREE. I had never had to sit a book aside like I did when I read Room. (Well, until I read Live Through This. That one was a doozie for me.) Glad you enjoyed it, but also glad you understand why it was uncomfortable for me. :)

September 30, 2014 - 8:38 pm

Magan - Sue, I haven’t read any books by Ellen Hopkins yet. I should fix that. A few times I’ve looked for them at my local library, but they had them out of sequence and I haven’t remembered to put them on hold. :-/ Thanks for the suggestion!!

September 30, 2014 - 7:10 pm

BookCupid - Great compilation, read a lot of these books.
My TTT

September 30, 2014 - 5:39 pm

Amanda - Room is on my list too. It was such a powerfully written book, but I have rarely felt so uncomfortable the whole time I was reading.

September 30, 2014 - 2:57 pm

Sue - I’ve read Room and Live Through This, both excellent books. I think the toughest book I have read was Tricks by Ellen Hopkins, have you read any of her books? All tough subjects but written in verse which for some reason makes such an impact.

September 30, 2014 - 11:38 am

Magan - Chrissi, I hope you give Rites of Passage a go! It’s FANTASTIC. The buzz isn’t publisher-generated. It’s well-deserved and so worth the read. I really hope that you find some great books from this list, even if they’re not always easy to read! :)

September 30, 2014 - 11:37 am

Magan - Oh, Cait. I completely understand. Tease was difficult because the MC was just so, so unlikeable. I wanted to hate her. Rites of Passage is one of my absolute favorite books this year. I hope you’ll give it a try. It’s hard, yes, but OH SO VERY GOOD. (And incredibly well-written!)

September 30, 2014 - 11:36 am

Magan - Brianna, it was so uncomfortable. I completely agree. I put it aside for a long while and stopped reading it. (Only to realize that if I had read about 6 more pages, BIG things would have happened and my anxiety would have decreased severely.) There are some tough books on this list, but for sure amazing ones. I hope you’ll give a few of them a try!

September 30, 2014 - 11:34 am

Magan - Cassie, it’s so true. Even as someone who is a Christian (though I don’t believe everything was as black and white as the MC’s community wanted her to believe), it was such a difficult read for me. I remember cringing and just really aching for her as she tried to figure out what she believed. A tough read, yes, but I hope also encouraging for those who read it and are working through their own dilemmas.

September 30, 2014 - 11:02 am

Cassie @ Happy Book Lovers - Small Town Sinners was one of the hardest books to read for me. Ever. I have never come across people like this in real life, so it was hard for me to understand the religious community and all the activities they did. I feel like those shouldn’t be allowed, especially as a community event people must participate in. But the hardest part was reading it from the MC’s point of view and listening to her thoughts about gay marriage and abortions, and that those vastly disagreed with my own opinions. I’m glad I read it, but it was still really hard for me to get through. I think it made a really good point and did well exploring the topics from a different point of view than I would normally read, and by the end, everything made sense. But that will always stick out to me as being a difficult book to get through.

September 30, 2014 - 10:41 am

Brianna - I’ve only read Room. Clearly, I avoid books with difficult subjects. I didn’t love Room. I thought it was strange and unrealistic. Not that kidnapping is unrealistic, but the whole premise just weirded me out.

September 30, 2014 - 6:42 am

Cait @ Notebook Sisters - I really find books about bullying super hard to read too. :( I mean, usually they’re good and they have such strong messages and they need to be said! But I tend to avoid them…I couldn’t read Tease. I WOULD like to try Rites of Passage but … not yet. >_<
Here’s my TTT!

September 30, 2014 - 12:46 am

Chrissi Reads - I didn’t think Rites of Passage would be a book that I wanted to read, but the buzz around it is really making me want to read it! I really want to check out most of the books on your list!

Back to Top|Subscribe via RSS|Subscribe by Email

Estelle: Complete Nothing by Kieran Scott

Complete Nothing by Kieran ScottComplete Nothing by Kieran Scott ( web | tweet )
Book 2 of the True Love series.
Publication Date: September 30, 2014
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Kids
Pages: 336
Target audience: Young adult
Keywords: Greek mythology, pressures of senior year, family secrets
Format read: ARC paperback from S&S. (Thanks!)

Summary: Cupid a.k.a. True is still dealing with her banishment from Mount Olympus to a high school in New Jersey but now with an added complication: her true love, Orion, just enrolled in the same high school and has no idea who she is. It’s not easy to have the distraction of her boyfriend not being her boyfriend at school, but her latest project is proving to be a difficult one. Peter and Claudia, high school sweethearts, break up out of nowhere and she is determined to get them back together. Will it work? Will she be closer to going home?

It was so great to be back experience the antics of True as she tries to make another love connection in Complete Nothing. (She is too funny.) Kieran Scott took a way different approach with couple #2 (True has to make three connections before she’s allowed to return to Mount Olympus) and I thought it was fantastic: a totally over-the-moon for each other couple dealing with the stresses of graduation, college applications, and a possible future apart. Claudia is already a shoe-in for Princeton while star football player Peter is pretty much allergic to talking about next steps.

Early on, you can see that Claudia and Peter have such a comfortable relationship. Some of their friends tease them for acting “married” but it’s Claudia’s determination to help Peter that causes him to irrationally dump her in front of the whole school. It’s completely out of character, and while Peter regrets it immediately, he doesn’t act quickly on fixing anything. Enter: True. She can see how much Claudia and Peter care about each other so she is going to help them find their way back to one another. Bonus? Orion is also on the football team now. Yay for proximity!

Of course, there would be no story if things didn’t go smoothly. True decides to use jealousy as the weapon of choice to get Claudia and Peter back together. Add in a rival football player, a confident cheerleader, True’s tendency to rush into things and you’ve got trouble. As we switch POVs between Peter, Claudia, and True, I wasn’t sure if things would end up working out. What I did like was how Peter and Claudia’s relationship was never perfect, even when they were happy. They never rushed to say “I love you” and they definitely had some kinks to work out. I wondered if they would get the chance to work through those together.

In the meantime, Scott folds in a plotline with True’s life back at home. There’s some impending danger when the wrong people find out about her relationship with Orion, and then there’s a matter of trust due to her good friend Hephaestus (who is on Earth to help her out) and a few family secrets. I like that we never lose sight of that ticking clock True is up against, and how her past actions are still affecting those on Mt. Olympus. I also can’t forget a few of the kids from the high school who come to her aid (especially the adorable and thoughtful Wallace) as she tries to get her “assignment” done.

I’ve enjoyed this True Love series more than I ever thought. The Greek details are interesting, I love watching True acclimate to a new world, and it’s also fun to experience these different love stories and see how they unfold. I can barely wait to see how Scott wraps up the series because I want our girl to get her own true love back. (Is it possible she decides to stay in New Jersey instead of return to her home? Hm… with this series, the possibilities seem limitless.)

Rather Be Reading Buy It Icon

Add Complete Nothing to Goodreads | Buy on B&N | Buy on Amazon | My Interview with True

Psst. For those of you who haven’t read Only Everything yet, there’s only a few mentions of the couple True befriends in the first book but you never get the complete story. So if you do have to read these out of order, it’s not the end of the world. Although, it’s definitely more satisfying to read them in the order they were published.

October 31, 2014 - 9:53 pm

Book Review: Complete Nothing | Books, TV, and Me - […] Rather Be Reading […]

October 8, 2014 - 11:17 pm

Alexa S. - Not going to lie – I’m VERY excited to read Complete Nothing! Picked up my copy from Books of Wonder the other day, and I can’t wait to dive in. I’m curious to see how everyone is doing, particularly True. And of course I want to see how everything works out for this couple too!

September 29, 2014 - 12:44 pm

Quinn @ Quinn's Book Nook - I’ve been really curious about these Keiran Scott books. Seriously they have the most adorable covers!!

This book does seem really cute, and I’m glad to hear you liked it.

September 29, 2014 - 10:27 am

Cassie @ Happy Book Lovers - I’ve seen quite a bit of praise for the first book, and I knew a lot of people were getting excited about the second one. I haven’t quite gotten around to reading them yet, so I may have to go find the first one at the library soon! This looks really good!

Back to Top|Subscribe via RSS|Subscribe by Email

Big Kids’ Table: Leah + Her Pretty Good Book Jar

big kids

Hello, reading buddies! It’s been awhile — I skipped last month, eek — but don’t worry, I’m back and even better I’m back with a huge book enthusiast who reviews “big kid” books all the time on her blog: The Pretty Good Gatsby. Leah is better than “pretty good”. Magnificent? Enthusiastic? Smart, awesome, lovely, and always inspiring me to pick up hidden gems? Yep. Pretty much all the above. I love her blog + I can’t think of anyone better to be a part of Big Kids’ Table.

Leah from The Pretty Good Gatsby

Note: this is Leah but not her cat.

This month, Leah is taking charge and giving us some amazing suggestions. Enjoy!

Hi guys! I’ve been a huge fan of Big Kids Table since Day 1 and I’m so excited to be here with you today! Here’s the deal – instead of choosing my books, we’re switching it up a bit: I’m having them chosen for me. Back in July, I made a super easy Book Jar. If you’re anything like me, staring at a giant mountain of books can be a little overwhelming. This takes all the stress out of it. Whenever I’m in the mood for a book and can’t decide, I pull out a star and I’m set.

For this edition of Big Kids’ Table I’m letting the jar pick for me – fingers crossed!

BOOK ONE: The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Okay, confession time: I miiight have squealed a little when this was the first pick. Yes, I’ve had this book on my shelves for ages and yes, I’ve heard how super fantastic awesome it is! So many bloggers I adore and trust absolutely love this novel: an orderly, socially awkward professor is on a quest to find a wife. I’m all about quirky, charming novels and even better – a sequel is coming out in December!

BOOK TWOThe Venetian Bargain by Marina Fiorato

Venice, 1576. A passenger aboard a cargo ship sends the Bubonic Plague tearing through the city. Don’t judge me, but I love reading about deadly plagues and diseases. The Venetian Bargain seems to have a little bit of everything: romance, mystery, real-life events. Although I love Historical Fiction, I’ve noticed I tend to stick to certain time periods, but I think coming out of my comfort zone won’t be too difficult with this one!

BOOK THREEHemlock Grove by Brian McGreevy

OMG CAN WE DISCUSS THAT SECOND SEASON CLIFFHANGER?! If you’re not watching this show you should probably fix that. It’s campy and ridiculous and a ton of fun! A Gypsy boy who turns into a werewolf, a fabulously wealthy vampire with a Frankenstein-esque little sister. Seriously, what’s not to love? I immediately bought a copy of this book after watching the first season but never got around to reading it. I made the horrible mistake of binging on the second season (thanks a lot, Netflix) and the withdrawal is torture. With season three not coming back until next summer I’ll need to get my fix with the novel!

BOOK FOURPioneer Girl by Bich Minh Nguyen

So now that I had my book jar pick some books for me, I think it’s time I highlighted one I’ve actually read! You know a book is special when you still think about it eight months later. Raise your hand if you grew up reading Little House on the Prairie! Looking for an adult version? I’ve got you covered. Pioneer Girl tells the story of a Vietnamese-American woman and the family heirloom that sends her on a cross-country journey. I love dual narratives and Lee’s story was just as fascinating as Rose Wilder’s and when the pieces finally came together…perfection.

My reading list is going to hate me, but ahh — I love the sound of these. Thanks for sharing, Leah!

To make sure you get great book recs from Leah ALL the time, follow her blog and tweet her!

Be sure to leave any awesome reading suggestions below too!

October 8, 2014 - 11:14 pm

Alexa S. - First, BOOK JAR! That sounds like an amazing idea – and one I miiiiight have to take inspiration from. Second, I can’t wait to read The Rosie Project! I’ve had it for a while, but have been holding off. Third, PIONEER GIRL! That book sounds FANTASTIC. Will definitely have to check it out as I was a HUGE Laura Ingalls Wilder fan.

October 3, 2014 - 8:37 am

Jamie - LOVED The Rosie Project!!! (which reminds me that The Rosie Effect came out or is coming out soon). I hope you love it, too! Also haven’t heard of the other ones but definitely checking them out. I’ve always read adult fiction but since blogging YA became my main thang but I’ve been reading a lot more adult fiction and craving it more lately so I’m glad to have some books to look at!

September 28, 2014 - 10:25 pm

Jess - I like the way you fold-up the papers in your book jar post. These are some great picks that I’ve seen around. The Rosie Project sounds like a fun read.

September 28, 2014 - 6:02 pm

Leah - YAAAAAAY! ♥♥ MWAH!

um just so no one freaks out, the cat is legit. I’m not a cat burglar (HA!). His name is Leo & he’s a sweetheart.

September 28, 2014 - 12:24 pm

Sue - Love the idea of a book jar! Happy reading :)

Back to Top|Subscribe via RSS|Subscribe by Email

Estelle: Paper Airplanes by Dawn O’Porter

Paper Airplanes by Dawn OPaper Airplanes by Dawn O’Porter ( web | tweet )
Publication Date: September 9, 2014
Publisher: Amulet
Pages: 272
Target audience: Young adult
Keywords: friendship, parents, school
Format read: ARC from Publisher via NetGalley.

Summary: Even though they are students at the same school, Renee and Flo meet at a party. Kind of. Flo saves Renee from an already embarrassing situation, and soon they find themselves stealing away to have an open friendship with one another. Both are at a place in their lives where they are feeling cast aside and nothing is truly in their hands. Together, they form an honest and undeniable bond but secrets force to break it all open.

Female friendship as the focal point in young adult books? We all know it does not happen a lot, and this is why I was so anxious to read Paper Airplanes by Dawn O’Porter. (Added bonus: all the British-isms since the book takes places there.) Unfortunately, this book (deemed gritty and powerful) did not win me over as much as I wanted it to. I’m breaking this one down with a list.

I loved:

  • This book truly depicts what it is like to fall in love with a friend. Even though Renee and Flo keep their friendship under wraps at first, I loved how they were able to be so honest with one another even when it sucked and especially because they didn’t have many people in their lives they could count on. The adventures, the notes, the encouragement: it was real and it was fantastic. I adored the way they loved each other.
  • The author conveys a very normal teenage life filled with tests, drinking, parties, and yes, sex. I thought it was great but because of other books I’ve read that have done it just as well, it did not feel quite as groundbreaking to me. (Though Renee’s “relationship” with a guy who obviously adores her and she can’t figure out why she doesn’t feel the same way? Great, great addition; happens so much and it’s difficult to explain to others and to ourselves.)
  • The time period. Hello, 1990s. Adios cellphones and the internet. So refreshing not to have an interruptions from texts and emails and focus more on how we communicated back then. Calling people on landlines, writing notes on paper airplanes, and sometimes having to wait to talk to someone because you never got their number. Ah, the joys of radio silence.

What didn’t work for me as much:

  • Something in the book truly irked me. It’s a big deal and I don’t want to reveal it here but it was so serious and I thought, not dealt with the way that it should have, especially as readers see how the book is wrapped up. I was so angry on behalf of one of our characters, and while I know not everything is going to be resolved completely, it seemed like it wasn’t taken as seriously as it should. Now maybe that’s just a reflection of our culture today? But still. Bothered. Angry.
  • The pacing. The action in the book truly picks up in the last third of the book, and, by then, it felt way too late. The middle dragged a bit and by the end, when things revved up, I wanted the book to be longer. It felt a off balance and didn’t keep my attention as much as I would have wanted it to.

In the end, Paper Airplanes was a toss up as far as a rating goes. I did get emotional when it came to these characters, and if you want to meet some of the most infuriating families in the history of literature, you will find it in this book. Not to mention one of the shittiest best friends ever. Oh gosh. I wanted to punch her in the face multiple times. I was so relieved Renee and Flo found each other, despite all the complications, because they needed someone on their side badly.

rather be reading borrow from the library icon

Add to Goodreads | Buy on Amazon | Buy on B&N

November 17, 2014 - 9:00 am

Wildlife by Fiona Wood | YA Book Review - […] was reminded a lot of my reading of Paper Airplanes from a few weeks ago. Two girls become friends, one of them has a toxic best gal pal, and there […]

October 8, 2014 - 11:11 pm

Alexa S. - Honestly, your mixed reaction is making me even more curious about Paper Airplanes! I think it’s interesting that it focuses so heavily on friendship (love this!) and I like that it’s set in the 1990s. I’m very curious about what it was that had you so disturbed! We’ll have to see if that intrigues me enough to pick up a copy ;)

September 29, 2014 - 8:30 pm

elena - ooh this book sounds kind of interesting except i feel like i would be pretty angry reading it. now i wonder what that thing that irked you was.

September 26, 2014 - 11:20 am

Jen @Fefferbooks - How I LOVE when you girls review books I haven’t heard of, yet! Your review’s made me want to run out to the library and pick this up right now, E. Thanks! :D

Back to Top|Subscribe via RSS|Subscribe by Email