Big Kids’ Table: 2014 Reflections

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Another year almost done. Are they all going to go as fast as this one? I sure hope not because I think part of my brain is still hanging out in the spring. Ha! It’s been another interesting year of Big Kids’ Table feature. Unlike many other blog features I see, I still haven’t been able to get my rhythm done with this one. No two posts are ever the same, and while I should be proud of that, sometimes it makes me feel like this feature was never full realized.

But, hey, I’m recommending readers non-YA books, right? So part of it is working. In fact, there are a few posts I totally loved this year…

And now, a rundown of the most memorable non-YA books I’ve gobbled up this year… hopefully in time for your holiday shopping:

What took me so long?

Big Kids Table 2014 Overview What Took Me So Long

The world told me and I listened. The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion and Me Before You by Jojo Moyes = total wins. Emotional but also with such humor folded in. DON’T FORGET THE HUMOR.

Let’s fall in love.

It’s not a reading year if there isn’t romance. Am I right? What do I need to recommend a romance from the highest mountain? Chemistry, a great story, and some fantastic dialogue. Hope you’ll give these a whirl!

Big Kids Table 2014 Overview Romance Novels

Looking for Trouble by Victoria Dahl | A Passionate Love Affair with a Perfect Stranger by Lucy Robinson | Her Holiday Man by Stacey Shannon

Sah-prise!

Big Kids' Table Most Surprising of 2014

Two VERY different titles that were almost a shock to my own reading system. The Good Girl by Mary Kubica, a fantastic debut, about a woman who is kidnapped.  The story is told from alternate POVs and positively creepy, emotional and yet understandable. And then to change things up completely, Charlie’s Glass Slippers: a makeover, career confidence, and romance drama. Guys, this book might be long but it is so so much fun. (The cover is pretty sweet too!)

No one hit wonder.

After I Do by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Taylor Jenkins Reid’s Forever Interrupted still tops my list as one of the most realistic, perfect books for someone in their mid-20s. Her follow-up about a young couple that decides to separate and not speak for a year was full of so many moments that made me thinking about how we can easily start to take people for granted in our lives, and also easily fall into habit and lose something so valuable. I can’t recommend Taylor’s work enough.

Runner-up: The Fragile World by Paula Treick DeBoard: a family torn apart after a tragedy and revenge.

A recommendation that hit the spot.

Steal the North by Heather Bergstrom

Steal the North freaking knocked my socks off. For regular YA readers, this is the perfect pick for crossover because the main character is a teen going through a ton of changes with family, boys, and herself. The writing is beyond spectacular. Big thanks to Leah at The Pretty Good Gatsby for putting it on my radar.

Runner up: Burial Rites by Hannah Kent. I’m not one to usually pick up historical romances but I’m glad I read this one. It’s so emotional and well-done. (A review at So Obsessed Blog to get you inspired to read Burial Rites!)

The in-betweeners.

Yep. I’m adding some New Adult picks in this time. Guys, they were great and you have to read them. If you are worried about being overwhelmed by the sex, don’t me… these are all a combination of super sexy and well-developed.

Big Kids Table New Adult Book Recommendations 2014

Make It Count by Megan Erickson | Last Will and Testament by Dahlia Adler | Unraveled by Jen Frederick

A hopeful wish.

Well, being that I didn’t read any of the books I thought I would in 2014 per this post, I’m going to try again with better results. I swear! At the end of next year, I will most certainly be patting myself on the back for following through on this very short list. Right? Right?! I need you all to cheer me on.

Big Kids Table 2014 Overview What to Read in 2015

 Girl Before Mirror by Liza Palmer | A Little Princess by Frances H. Burnett | My Father’s Wives by Mike Greenberg


A quick announcement: I’m changing up Big Kids’ Table again in 2015 (I hinted to it slightly in last month’s post) and if you want to share your non-YA recs in this capacity, I would love to hear from you. Email me anytime: estelle AT ratherbereadingblog DOT com. I swear it will be oodles of fun, and I’d love to have you.

Until the next Big Kids’ Table, happy holidays, happy reading, and enjoy the rest of the year.

And remember: don’t be afraid to read outside of your genre. 🙂

December Author Potluck | Big Kids’ Table

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Today we’re hosting a dinner party so I’m glad you are here because the guests of honor are awesome. All four of them have books releasing this month, and were kind enough to attend this potluck get-together at a pretty late hours. (Wink wink; thanks ladies!)

It’s been awhile since we’ve had a get-together like this one on Big Kids’ Table and who knows? It might be a sign of what’s to come in the new year. But right now, we have four talented authors with their own shiny new books and on top of that, some personal non-YA recommendations for you. I hope you get a kick out of these and find something to add to your TBR too.

Happy Fridayyyy!


Molli Moran Recommends Non-YA Rather Be Reading Blog

Molli’s pick & pitch: I recently had the chance to read Becka Paula’s New Adult debut, EVERLY AFTER, which I thought was such an unconventional and brave romance. EVERLY AFTER is a tense, beautiful story about two damaged individuals who see the best in one another – and the versions of themselves they can become.
What’s new (dinner convo): When I’m not reading whatever I can get my hands on, I’m working on the sequel to my first book, AS YOU TURN AWAY. The sequel is called AS WE FALL TOGETHER and with luck, will be published in the spring of 2015!

Add ONE SONG AWAY to Goodreads | Visit Molli on the web + twitter

Lorraine Z Rosenthal Recommends Non-YA Rather Be Reading Blog

Lorriane’s pick: White Oleander by Janet Fitch
Her pitch: WHITE OLEANDER is an adult book with a young protagonist who ages from 12 to 20 during the course of the novel. It’s a raw, compelling, emotional tale about a girl who is the victim of her mother’s bad choices and struggles to make her way in the world. It’s also an excellent movie!
What’s new (dinner convo): My latest novel, INDEPENDENTLY WEALTHY, was published by St. Martin’s Press on December 2, so I’m currently very busy with a blog tour, etc.

Visit Lorraine on the web + twitter | My review of Independently Wealthy

Liz Czukas Recommends Non-YA Rather Be Reading Blog

Liz’s pick: Bloodsucking Fiends by Christopher Moore
Her pitch: This is not your average vampire book–it’s hilarious. Like all of Christopher Moore’s books, it turns your assumptions on their heads. If you love the fun, relatable voice of humorous YA writers like Josh Berk and Louise Rennison, you will never be disappointed by Chris Moore.
What’s new (Dinner convo): My 2nd YA book, TOP TEN CLUES YOU’RE CLUELESS comes out on December 9. Then my first New Adult book under my pen name Ellie Cahill, WHEN JOSS MET MATT, comes out on February 24, 2015! Other than that, I’ve got a couple of YA and NA projects in the works that I can’t talk about yet!

Liz Czukas on the web + on twitter | Magan’s review of TOP 10 CLUES

Alison Cherry Recommends Non-YA Rather Be Reading BlogAlison’s pick: The Robber Bride by Margaret Atwood
Her pitch
: In any book, the most important thing to me is well-drawn characters, and the four protagonists of The Robber Bride seem so real that I’ve never thought of them as characters at all—I just think of them as people I know. There have been times I’ve been out shopping and thought, “Oh, Charis would like that,” before I remembered she’s not a real person. The plot is so well paced and intricately woven and ultimately quite suspenseful, and the way Atwood describes these four women loving and hurting and manipulating each other is incredibly masterful. I’ve read this book every few years since I was about sixteen, and it never fails to delight me.
What’s new (dinner convo): I have two books coming out in 2016! The first, Grandma Jo’s Guide to Prim and Proper Pilfering, is a middle grade about a girl who discovers that her grandmother’s bridge club is actually a heist ring. The second, Look Both Ways, is a YA about musical theater and two girls walking the very fine line between obsessive platonic friendship and romantic love.

Alison’s upcoming book FOR REAL releases on December 9. Big sisters on a reality TV show adventure!

Alison Cherry on the web + twitter


You were brilliant guests, Molli, Lorraine, Liz, and Alison! I hope you’ll be back soon!

Now it’s your turn! What great non-YA have you read lately?

(My current recommendations are The Rosie Project and Her Holiday Man!)

Big Kids’ Table: Cassie Takes Charge

big kids' table - adult fiction feature on rather be reading

It’s beyond a treat to welcome my favorite book blogger/cheerleader, Cassie, from Books with Cass to the Big Kids’ Table. Last year, she provided a Blogger Rec (if you remember) and today I gave her full reign of July’s feature. Hope you enjoy! xoxo

Oh well hello there lovelies!  I’m taking over the table today and talking about some of my favorite big kids’ books!  We have quite an array of genres that we are showcasing today but let’s start with a contemporary to kick things off shall we?

→ One Plus One by JoJo Moyes is an absolute delight. Jojo once again captures the heart and spirit of love in all its forms. She takes you on a journey of one group of people and shows you how they really all become a unit.

One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

→ Next, we have a “new to me” author Sarah Addison Allen. Allen write southern fiction with a dash of magical realism. In her latest novel, Lost Lake, she takes you through two women’s lives and shows you what a single place can mean to a person. It was truly fantastic.

Lost Lake by Sarah Allen

→ For those suspense fans out there we have Tana French. Everything she touches is gold and so therefore I recommend EVERYTHING.  Start with In the Woods and continue from there. She weaves an intricate plot line through all her novels and continues to shock and amaze me in the best of ways.

In the Woods by Tanya French

→ You didn’t think I would leave out historical fiction did you?  No way!  I’ve got two here as well. One is I Shall Be Near to You by Erin Lindsay McCabe and the other is Madam by Cari Lynn. Madam is basically the story of a prostitute trying to come up the ranks in old school New Orleans. It’s a pretty awesome story that didn’t get enough buzz and it’s also pretty light on the historical side so I think it could appeal to those testing out the genre.

Madam By Cari Lynn

→ On the other hand, I Shall Be Near to You is a Civil War novel about a woman determined to stay with her husband who has gone off to war. This story is GORGEOUS. AND FLAWLESS. SIMPLY wonderful from start to finish. I would suggest you read it ASAP.

I Shall Be Near You by Erin McCabe

 

Alright guys. Thanks for sticking with me through all my recommendations!  I hope you try some out and sip on a nice cold beverage while you do so!

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Massive thanks to Cassie for the variety of titles she shared with us today!

Don’t forget to stop by her blog or Twitter to leave her some love! ♥

Big Kids’ Table: Books Equal the Best Accessories

 

big kids' table - adult fiction feature on rather be reading

It’s Monday so I’m feeling rebellious. That’s right. I chose books by their covers. NO ONE THROW THINGS AT ME. Basically, I was in the bookstore last week, checking out the New Fiction table, and stumbled upon some beautiful looking books. Not just beautiful but bright and eye-catching. When it comes to summer, I am about bright sundresses, nail colors, lips, sunglasses… everything! I love love color. So today I want you think of these books as some gorgeous piece of clothing in a shop window or even the best looking umbrella on the beach…

Because regardless of what we are taught, a good cover is a HUGE reason why we pick up a book in the first place, right?

Let’s see what we have today…

For Once in my Life by Marianne Kavanagh

This image doesn’t do the book cover justice. It’s so so so bright!

Description from Goodreads: Meet Tess.  A vintage clothes–obsessive, she’s trapped in a frighteningly grown-up customer relations job she loathes. Still, she’s been dating the gorgeous accountant Dominic since university, and has a perfectly lovely flat, which she shares with her best friend, Kirsty. But if her life is so perfect, why does she tear up whenever anyone mentions her future?

Meet George. He’s a brilliant jazz musician who spends almost as much time breaking up fights between his bickering band mates as he does worrying about his ailing father and living up to his stockbroker girlfriend’s very high expectations. For a guy who has always believed in romance, the grim practicalities of twenty-something life have come as something of a shock. Seemingly always on the verge of a big break, he’s looking for something more…something special.

They just might be two halves of one perfect whole. Now, if only they could manage to cross paths…

(I actually chatted about this book in my Shelve It from this weekend.)

Em and the Big Hoom by Jerry Pinto

Great font and colors, right?

Description from Goodreads: In a one-bedroom-hall-kitchen in Mahim, Bombay, through the last decades of the twentieth century, lived four love-battered Mendeses: mother, father, son and daughter. Between Em, the mother, driven frequently to hospital after her failed suicide attempts, and The Big Hoom, the father, trying to hold things together as best he could, they tried to be a family.

Bonus: I’m seeing a ton of 5-star ratings on Goodreads.

Mood Indigo by Boris Vian

Oh gosh. I realized I was so blinded by these colors that I fell for a movie tie-in cover. Can you blame me? As soon as I saw that sky, I imagined doing a NAILED IT based on it. Anyway…

Description from B&N: First published in 1947, Mood Indigo perfectly captures the feverishly creative, melancholy romance of mid-century Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Recently voted number ten on Le Monde’s list of the 100 Books of the Century (the top ten also included works by Camus, Proust, Kafka, Hemingway, and Steinbeck), Boris Vian’s novel has been an icon of French literature for fifty years—the avant-garde, populist masterpiece by one of twentieth-century Paris’s most intriguing cultural figures, a touchstone for generations of revolutionary young people, a jazz-fueled, science-fiction-infused, sexy, fantastical, nouveau-decadent tear-jerker that has charmed and beguiled hundreds of thousands of readers around the world. With the help of Michel Gondry and Audrey Tautou, it is set to seduce many, many more.

A Girl Walks Into a Wedding by Helena S. Paige

Not only is this cover fun but this book is one of those “choose your own adventure” books…

Abbreviated description from B&N: Your best friend is getting married and she’s asked you to be a bridesmaid. You have so many decisions to make. . . .  You also have to navigate through the bachelorette party, the bride’s wedding jitters, the dress from hell, and more. Perhaps the most tempting option is to flee the entire affair with a tall, dark stranger . . . or maybe an old friend who could surprise you with a sizzling encounter. You make the decisions—a wild ride is guaranteed.

Ten Things I've Learnt About Love

It’s interesting how many of these book started out with a toned-down cover and released a second, more vibrant one!

Description from Goodreads: About to turn thirty, Alice is the youngest of three daughters, and the black sheep of her family.  Drawn to traveling in far-flung and often dangerous countries, she has never enjoyed the closeness with her father that her two older sisters have and has eschewed their more conventional career paths.  She has left behind a failed relationship in London with the man she thought she might marry and is late to hear the news that her father is dying.  She returns to the family home only just in time to say good-bye.

Daniel is called many things—”tramp”, “bum”, “lost.”  He hasn’t had a roof over his head for almost thirty years, but he once had a steady job and a passionate love affair with a woman he’s never forgotten.  To him, the city of London has come to be like home in a way that no bricks and mortar dwelling ever was.  He makes sculptures out of the objects he finds on his walks throughout the city—bits of string and scraps of paper, a child’s hair tie, and a lost earring—and experiences synesthesia, a neurological condition which causes him to see words and individual letters of the alphabet as colors.  But as he approaches his sixties his health is faltering, and he is kept alive by the knowledge of one thing—that he has a daughter somewhere in the world whom he has never been able to find.

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So what do we think any keepers in this group? Four out of the 5 books are strong contenders for me. (Not sure “choose your own adventure” is something I want to try again.)

What about you? What’s the last book you picked based on a cover? 🙂

Thanks for checking out this month’s Big Kids’ Table! ♥

Big Kids’ Table: Receipt Recommendations

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March 31st already! Here’s hoping spring is truly on the way this time! I’m really looking forward to reading a book outside instead of curled up under 2 blankets at home or in a hefty jacket on the subway. For now, let’s focus on today’s BKT. I am so excited about it!

Here’s the story: Last week, I went to the B&N near work to pick up a copy of Lauren Graham’s Someday, Someday, Maybe for a friend (a book I bought for myself last year) and I got one of those receipts with a short list of books I might be interested in. I’ve gotten so many of these in the past and I barely glance at them before throwing the receipt away.

Since SSM is definitely my taste, I thought I would go through the recommendations and find out if I would consider reading any of them.  Hopefully you’ll get excited about a few too!

Let’s check it out! (Excuse my doodle.)

Receipt Recommendations Big Kids Table 1

Pick #1: Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella

Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella

Lottie just knows that her boyfriend is going to propose during lunch at one of London’s fanciest restaurants. But when his big question involves a trip abroad, not a trip down the aisle, she’s completely crushed. So when Ben, an old flame, calls her out of the blue and reminds Lottie of their pact to get married if they were both still single at thirty, she jumps at the chance. No formal dates—just a quick march to the altar and a honeymoon on Ikonos, the sun-drenched Greek island where they first met years ago.

 Their family and friends are horrified. Fliss, Lottie’s older sister, knows that Lottie can be impulsive—but surely this is her worst decision yet. And Ben’s colleague Lorcan fears that this hasty marriage will ruin his friend’s career. To keep Lottie and Ben from making a terrible mistake, Fliss concocts an elaborate scheme to sabotage their wedding night. As she and Lorcan jet off to Ikonos in pursuit, Lottie and Ben are in for a honeymoon to remember, for better . . . or worse.

Thoughts: This sounds a lot like My Best Friend’s Wedding… kind of. (Love that movie.) I have loved a lot of Sophie’s books in the past. I was a big fan of the Shopaholic series until it just turned into a drama fest and I really love her book, The Domestic Goddess. It’s hilarious. This synopsis sounds so familiar but it also sounds like it could be good…

Final answer: I wouldn’t buy it. Possibly borrow.

Pick #2:  The Star Attraction by Allison Sweeney

The Star Attraction by Alison Sweeney

Sophie is a Hollywood publicist who has a fabulous job, a fabulous boyfriend, and a fabulous life. She even scores her PR firm’s most important actor client and every woman’s dream—Billy Fox. 

But will a steamy make-out session in a restaurant alley with her big-name client cost Sophie her job? And does she really want an escape from her life and her loving, if imperfect, relationship with her investment banker boyfriend? The Star Attraction takes us on a wild ride through one woman’s daytime soap come to life.

Thoughts: Well, B&N knows me because I already bought this book when it came out. I haven’t read it yet but seeing it on this list made me dig it out of my bookshelf. I’m a big fan of Allison and I do love Hollywood stories…

Final answer: Getting to this super soon!

Pick #3: The Lost Husband by Katherine Center

The Lost Husband by Katherine Center

After the sudden loss of her husband in a car crash, Libby Moran falls on hard times-so hard, in fact, that she’s forced to move in with her hyper-critical mother. There, sleeping on the pull-out sofa so her two children can share the guest room, she can’t stop longing for the life she had. So when a letter arrives from Libby’s estranged aunt offering her a job and a place to live on her goat farm, Libby jumps at the opportunity. But starting over is never easy. With an aunt who is nothing like she imagined, a shaggy farm manager with a tragic past, a psychic at the feed store who claims to be able to contact the dead, and a bully at her daughter’s school, country life isn’t at all what Libby expected. But it also offers her what no other place can: A chance to define the good life for herself. A chance to piece together the mysteries of her own past. A chance, even, at love. And, finally, a chance to bring herself, and her family, back to life.

Thoughts: First thing that caught my eye with this one was that Goodreads is telling me readers also enjoyed Nowhere But Home, one of my favorites from last year. I love a country setting and second chances.

Final answer: Ding ding ding. I’m adding this one to my TBR immediately.

Pick #4: The American Heiress by Daisy Goodwin

the american heiress by daisy goodwinTraveling abroad with her mother at the turn of the twentieth century to seek a titled husband, beautiful, vivacious Cora Cash, whose family mansion in Newport dwarfs the Vanderbilts’, suddenly finds herself Duchess of Wareham, married to Ivo, the most eligible bachelor in England. Nothing is quite as it seems, however: Ivo is withdrawn and secretive, and the English social scene is full of traps and betrayals. Money, Cora soon learns, cannot buy everything, as she must decide what is truly worth the price in her life and her marriage.

Thoughts: I’m not sure why this book from the historical fiction genre would be recommended for those who buy Lauren Graham’s. I’m really not. The description is a little dry, and it doesn’t seem like my thing.

Final thought: I’ll pass on this one.

Pick #5: Revenge Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

Revenge Wears Prade by Lauren WeisbergerAlmost a decade has passed since Andy Sachs quit the job “a million girls would die for” working for Miranda Priestly at Runway magazine—a dream that turned out to be a nightmare. Andy and Emily, her former nemesis and co-assistant, have since joined forces to start a highend bridal magazine. The Plunge has quickly become required reading for the young and stylish. Now they get to call all the shots: Andy writes and travels to her heart’s content; Emily plans parties and secures advertising like a seasoned pro. Even better, Andy has met the love of her life. Max Harrison, scion of a storied media family, is confident, successful, and drop-dead gorgeous. Their wedding will be splashed across all the society pages as their friends and family gather to toast the glowing couple. Andy Sachs is on top of the world. But karma’s a bitch. The morning of her wedding, Andy can’t shake the past. And when she discovers a secret letter with crushing implications, her wedding-day jitters turn to cold dread. Andy realizes that nothing—not her husband, nor her beloved career—is as it seems. She never suspected that her efforts to build a bright new life would lead her back to the darkness she barely escaped ten years ago—and directly into the path of the devil herself…

Thoughts: Hmm. I feel a lot about Weisberger like I do about Kinsella. I loved a few of their books but they started to feel like the same thing over and over again. Devil Wears Prada was my favorite book of hers so I would be curious how main character Andi is doing… but then again the reviews are pretty poor.

Final thought: I’m curious. A “borrow” at some point but I’m not rushing to the library for it.

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Results: All in all, B&N didn’t do too bad with this one. I already one own, would buy another, borrow 2 and skip only one. I’d say those odds are pretty good.

What do you think? Any of these titles strike you? Or have you read any great grown up books lately?
Let me know below!

Big Kids’ Table: Something Old & Something New

big kids' table - adult fiction feature on rather be reading

How often do you research authors you read and liked a long time ago? For me, not so much. Unless I happen to see a familiar name, I don’t actively seek them out. But after two authors who I once loved so fiercely made their way on my radar again, I decided to take a look back and see what was new with some of my old favorites.

Today is a “double the pleasure” sort of post. On one hand, you are getting a highly recommended backlist title and on the other, a newer or upcoming book that might strike your fancy. I hope you enjoy the list as much as I enjoyed putting it together!

Anna Quindlen

Book I Loved: Rise & Shine | New Title: Still Life With Bread Crumbs (1/2014)

Anna Quindlen Big Kids Table Book Picks

I actually lent Rise & Shine to Magan many moons ago. It’s a strong story about family, sisters, different paths and it really resonated with me. (I have no idea why I picked it up at first. Paperback table?) I haven’t read a Quindlen since but her newest is about a photographer who hits tough times and escapes her life in NYC for a quieter one in a cabin. Sign me up!

Carole Radziwill

Book I Loved: What Remains (memoir) | New Title: The Widow’s Guide to Sex and Dating (2/2014)

Carole Radziwill Big Kids Table Book PIcks

I remember reading What Remains waiting in line for a musical at Disney’s Animal Kingdom one summer. I had sweat rolling down my back and tears rolling down my cheeks. It was a moment. What Remains is Carole’s memoir about her marriage soon to be cut short by cancer, and her friendship with JFK Jr. and Carolyn Bessette. (Carole’s husband was JFK’s cousin.) It’s a beautiful book about endearing unexpected tragedy in a short period of time, and it’s stayed with me all of these years. (Tip: the eBook is under 10 dollars — go buy it!) This year, Carole released her fiction debut: The Widow’s Guide to Sex and Dating. It sounds semi-autobiographical but I’m interested to see what she can do in this genre. (And someone compared her to Joan Didion, who is my writing idol! Big deal.)

Karen Joy Fowler

Book I Loved: The Jane Austen Book Club | New Title: We Are All Completely Besides Ourselves (pb 2/2014)

Karen Joy Fowler Big Kids Table Book Picks

I am so surprised over how low the ratings are for JABC on Goodreads. So incredibly low. It’s been a long time since I read it, sure. But it’s a paperback that I’ve kept in my collection even after I’ve culled time and time again. I loved the characters and their relationships. (Plus who doesn’t like a book club!) Fowler’s newest release actually came out in 2013 but the paperback is out in stores as of February, and the reviews were solid! Sounds like an interesting family dynamic that I need to experience for myself. (I should probably reschedule a re-read for JABC too.)

Sarah Bird

Book I Loved: The Gap Year | New Title: Above the East China Sea (May 2014)

Sarah Bird Big Kids Table Book Picks

First, The Gap Year is one of the first books I reviewe on RBR. It holds a dear place in my heart and I’m sad I’ve sort of forgotten it because I was over the moon when I first read it. (It’s since come out in paperback and I love the cover.) Mother daughter relationships in books never get old for me. But oh gosh, I love that Bird is taking on a semi-historical fiction set during World War II for her next book. I cannot wait to read this one. It sounds intense, and I do like stories that alternate between present day and the past.

[ BONUS PICK ]

Matthew Quick

New Title: The Good Luck of Right Now

The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew Quick

The truth is I own 3 (three!) books by Matthew and I haven’t read any of them yet. Two YAs (Sort of Like a Rock Star and Forgive Me Leonard Peacock) and also Silver Linings Playbook (I saw the movie twice; does that count?). I am the worst. This is why I go on book buying bans. His new novel came out two weeks ago and it was a very nice birthday present from a friend. Quick is a writing machine, isn’t he? Synopsis? A guy loses his mom, discovers she had been writing to Richard Gere, and as he sets off on a “new life” he continues to write to him as well. Sounds quirky, right? I need to get a move on with Matthew’s books!

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Have you read anything non-YA lately? Leave your suggestions below! And thanks for stopping in today!