Friends Who Write Diversely… | Dive Into Diversity

Dive Into Diversity Reading Challenge

Can someone please tell me how we are in the second week of August? Already? I’m not sure how this is happening. Is this real life? Either way, we are here for the eighth check-in for our #DiversityDive challenge. How’s it going? Read anything great lately? (I’m highly recommending: What You Left Behind by Jessica Verdi — how often do we see a single teenage dad in a book — and also Not After Everything by Michelle Levy — which is so heartbreaking but also has a character dealing with some economic diversity, in addition to many other challenges.) Now on to today’s post…

Big thanks to authors/bloggers/Twitter goddesses Dahlia Adler (Under the Lights) and Katherine Locke (Second Position) for being so game for today’s post. Rather Be Reading is rooted in a great friendship story, and, of course, books, so these two ladies cover both those topics as they chat about their own friendship (they met at BEA for the first time in 2014 and have hung out twice IRL), reading each other’s books, diversity, and, unsurprisingly, kissing. (Their characters, not each other… although Dahlia admitted to working on this in a hotel bed wearing underwear so this is pretty up-close and personal stuff.) There’s nothing I like more than candid and smart talk between two ladies who obviously have a lot of respect for each other and each other’s own work. I hope you enjoy their banter, their thoughtfulness, and their dedication to honesty in their books.

♦

on internet & friendships:

Dahlia Adler: I feel like there are layers to internet friends, because there are some you really talk to 98% publicly and only on the rarest of occasions maybe via DM and then there are those you talk to at least as much as you would anyone in person, thanks to gchat and texting.

Katherine Locke: And then the ones that you switch to text when they leave their computers so they can’t gchat. haha exactly. Yeah, there are definitely layers.

Dahlia: Yes, those 😉

Katherine: And also, like, we talk about things other than publishing and books. Most of my internet friendships stay in the same sphere where I met the person (fandom/animal rescue/publishing), but then there are a few that just become *friendships* without the modifier of “my editor friend” or “my animal rescue friend”.

Dahlia: Ohhh that is insightful! Very true. I love talking books/publishing and there are definitely people with whom that’s the only conversation we ever have.Which is great! But far rarer is the friend you meet on the internet who supersedes that original commonality.

Katherine: Exactly. and honestly, I think those are the ones that last too.

Dahlia: Ditto. Especially if/when you burn out on your common issue, like, then what?

Katherine: The friendship fizzles too. So yes, it doesn’t always happen but when it does, it’s awesome.

on authoring & characters & a splash of diversity:

Katherine: You were more worried about me reading Under the Lights than I was. And then I got sidelined and didn’t read it for a few weeks and you thought I hated it but actually I loved it. Hashtag oops.

Dahlia: Oh GOD, yes, I was so nervous about that one, but more because I thought it was a You book so being wrong about that would’ve been doubly bad.

Katherine: You’re usually right when you say a book is a Katie book so. yeah. but it’s strange and terrifying to have friends reading your books? Like strangers are much easier. Strangers I don’t mind if they don’t like it. But friends.

Dahlia: Exactly. But it was the BEST thing how much I loved Second Position. Like, it encompassed stuff I knew you were passionate about, obviously, but still wasn’t quite what I thought it would be.

It didn’t strike me until I was reading it how rare character-driven NA is, so I think just seeing that at all was such a big deal. Hahaha yes, THANK YOU.

Katherine: YOU’RE WELCOME.

Dahlia: Like, your name on it or not, the character-driven aspect would’ve been surprising to see in NA. But it makes such a world of difference in a book where you’re talking about neurodiversity and physical disability.

Katherine: This is strange we’re talking about me too much I don’t know what to do… When people ask me what my process is, I say it’s a lot of listening. And I think SP reflects that?

Dahlia: I feel like therapy and trauma are so often so halfass in NA – and I say this as someone who often gets about LWaT that Lizzie wasn’t sad enough, so I’m not excepting myself from this – so it was very cool to see not only therapy done really well but done well in a story where the characters and how their brains work is the center.

Katherine: Yes, that was really important. And one of Aly’s sessions with her therapist in Finding Center kind of touched on that again, that sometimes it’s hard to feel better when you’ve suffered a mental illness? That mental illness itself causes a trauma and that affects you.

When you wrote UtL, did that factor in? Because it felt like it did…that Van denying herself to herself for so long had affected all these other parts of her life, that the ripple effect of closeting touched ALL of her life, not just her work, not just her relationship. It’s one of the things I liked about the handling of that. Because I feel like sometimes in books where a character struggles with how or if to come out, they only think about it when they’re with their significant other, or when they’re wondering how their friends will handle it. You don’t see the exhaustion, the fear, the worry, the secrets affecting job performance and life and their ability to hold onto their image etc.

Dahlia: Definitely – a big part of UtL is Vanessa’s using Hollywood as a way to confuse her emotions so she doesn’t have to deal with them. Like, oh, it’s Hollywood, of course I find women beautiful – I find everyone beautiful! Of course they fake relationships are fine – everything we do is about manufacturing connections and putting on a show! And she doesn’t let herself see how it hurts her, or what she isn’t letting herself think. That’s why I found the idea of writing about Hollywood teens so compelling – I can’t imagine being a teen and not feeling EVERYTHING in an organic way. But it’s their job not to.

Katherine: Exactly. And then everything doesn’t feel real. Which is why I think she and Josh do so well together because his ‘real’ is actually his ‘fake’, just like hers. P.S. I’m pretty sure you still owe me fanfic btw. Pls do not forget. My birthday is in February. Okay.

Dahlia: Yup. It’s funny because I get a lot of reviews that say they don’t think the dual-POV worked, and don’t think Josh and Van should’ve shared a book, and that is a total valid opinion I was very prepared for and had myself often when I was writing it. But the more I’ve thought about the book since, the more I personally disagree with it and think of all the ways I think it was important to show their parallel experiences.

Katherine: Yes yes yes. I will forever crow about the awesomeness of that friendship. It was fantastic. I loved it.

Dahlia: It’s like, as a reader, reading strictly for entertainment, I totally see it. But as someone who used these books to view and discuss Hollywood and representation in media across different genders, sexual orientations, and races? I am so, so happy both POVs are there.

on diversity & (of course) sex… 

Dahlia: Do you feel like people “got” the way you were presenting diversity aspects in your books?

Katherine: I really WANTED to show positive therapy. So even though those chapters didn’t work for some people, it was important. Hmm, most people were 100% with Aly and her mental health issues. But Zed gets coded as non-white, which is really interesting? and awkward.

Dahlia: Oh, right! I’ve seen you mention that. I’m so curious why that happens.

Katherine: Because a) then yes, I have to be like “yeahhhh I wrote a super white cast” and b) I think it’s interesting to notice who is coding him as Black, and why. And largely they’re doing it because he grew up religious, poor, and his name. Which is some internalized stereotyping I didn’t expect to happen but I had a slew of messages right after release demanding to know why it was a white character on the cover if Zed was Black and I had to be like “uhhh he’s not?”

Dahlia: That’s so interesting, especially considering the really high-profile ways we’ve seen it work in the other direction, e.g. Rue.

Katherine: It really is! I’ve been wanting to write about it but then I’m kind of scared of the backlash so *whistles*

Dahlia: (Meanwhile, I have also gotten the “Why are both girls on your cover white if Van is Korean?” I still never know how to answer that, because Van’s face is from an Asian model; it’s just photoshopped onto a white girl because diverse stock photo options are horrible.)

pause

Katherine: I guess we’re friends because you write really good kissing scenes.

Dahlia: Hahahahaha if that’s not the literal best reason for friendship I don’t even know what is. Do you have a favorite kissing or sex scene from your books?

Katherine Locke: New criteria for friendship. Please email 1 kissing scene for consideration. haha, uh, chapter 2 of Finding Center.

Dahlia: Uhhhhhhhhhhhh good choice.

Katherine: That one had me blushing when I was writing it and I write in Starbucks soooo.

Dahlia: That makes me so happy. Man, Finding Center had soooo much more sex.

Katherine: I am sorrynotsorry about that?

Dahlia: So would you say you’ve come to enjoy writing sex?

Katherine: hahaha I don’t know if I’d go that far? It’s easier to write now. But I still dread editing it. The only thing worse than writing sex is editing a sex scene. I have to bribe myself to scroll down to my editor’s comments. It’s painful.

Dahlia: Hahaha I wouldn’t mind viewing that, personally.

Katherine: Of course you wouldn’t.

Dahlia: Well I never. Oh I think we’re supposed to be talking about diversity more than banging. So, diversity! Do you feel like you want to continually focus on the neurodiversity and disability aspects – like, those will be your Thing – or do you see yourself integrating other areas into your writing?

on diversity and reader’s reactions and tough stuff:

Katherine: Good question re: diversity. I think that neurodiversity and disability are comfortable areas for me because I have personal experience with some of those. But I’m challenging myself so the next two NAs I’m drafting both have POC main characters, and every YA I’ve written has a POC MC (and thus has been beta read by someone from that respective ethnicity/race). And you? You’ve written two female POC characters now. What’s that like? What’s the response been?

Dahlia: Ooh, very cool! I love how different all your books sound. You’re very multifaceted in this way I am so very not.

Katherine: My brain is a dark and terrible place.

Dahlia: The response has been mostly really good from readers! More for Van than for Lizzie, I think partly because there are no Filipina MCs in American NA so some readers really loved her portrayal but some wanted a lot more from it and wanted to see more of the Philippines in it.

With Van, I’ve only seen positive response, 100%, and I definitely attribute that in large part to my Korean-American beta, who picked out little cultural things I think make a big difference.

Katherine: Right, I remember that. I think there’s sometimes (always?) a higher standard for books with diversity? because there’s only ONE book with this particular thing in it, it has to do all these things for all these different types of people, which is a lot of weight and expectation.

Dahlia: But also, it’s a book discussing race and lack of representation, so in UtL it dominates the story, whereas in LWaT it’s much more incidental. Yes, exactly, and that’s something I didn’t think enough about when I wrote LWaT for sure.

Katherine: It’s REALLY awesome when a reader does connect to your diverse characters though? it makes it worth it, all the doubt you had along the way.

Dahlia: YES, that part is really awesome. Getting letters about it, or seeing someone say it felt like solid representation they were glad to see – that means the world. Especially when a queer Asian woman says it about UtL, that is the best thing.

Katherine: Yeah, I had an amputee reader reach out (and she ended up beta reading certain important parts of FC for me) and another reader whose spouse is an alcoholic and she was SO WORRIED that Zed would relapse in SP? And when he didn’t, she realized how badly she needed to read that, that they could be OK too.

Dahlia: Ohhh that is awesome. It really is fascinating how fiction can provide a confirmation of sorts that things are possible.

Katherine: There’s a queer Asian girl out there who wants to be an actress who is reading Van and going “me too!”

Dahlia: Relapsing is not a given and tragedy in your coming out is not a given and sometimes it seems like there aren’t enough sources making that clear.

Katherine: Exactly. Or that things can go wrong, and you can still be OK. It’s not clear sailing OR tragedy. There’s a middle ground and most of us live there, and hey, we made it. Look at me. Being optimistic.

Dahlia: Yup. I think that’s part of why contemporary is sort of always “in,” even when trends go in waves – because there are certain stories people always need to see happening as realistically as possible.

Katherine: It’s also why I think contemporary is harder. You have to stay closer to people’s real experiences and emotions haha

Dahlia: Yeah, it’s scary, but if you can make characters feel real, I think you’re effectively creating a genuine and possible experience.

Katherine: That’s the goal!

♦

Ah, so so fun. Thanks for letting us eavesdrop on your conversation, ladies. Can’t wait for your new work! (Katherine releases FINDING CENTER on August 17th while we have to be a bit patient for Dahlia’s JUST VISITING — out in November.) Be sure to be following @MissDahlElama & @Bibliogato on Twitter so you never miss anything they say. (Seriously, it’s good stuff.)

Until next month… diversify your bookshelf and reading list, will ya? #DiversityDive

Hooray for Hollywood & Pride

[dropcap]T[/dropcap]here’s always that defining moment (or a few of them) when you realize you have to break away from what your parents want and do your own thing — even if this isn’t in their best interest. I’m reading a parenting guide for work right now, and the author talks about how parents need to know when to let go, and let their kids make their own choices. How else will they learn to deal with everything the real world throws at them? They need to be able to stand on their own two feet, and coddling (or controlling them) doesn’t make that happen.

Under the Lights by Dahlia Adler

Under the Lights by Dahlia Adler was published on June 30, 2015 by Spencer Hill Press. It’s a YA, dual POV, f/f love story about friendship, tough choices, and Hollywood. 312 pages.

Under the Lights by Dahlia Adler is no parenting guide (although the parents could use one) but is so much about that defining moment when you know you are about to go over the edge and start your life. (Plus fun, sweet, deep, and sexy.) In alternating POVs, we have Josh — a celebrity playboy known for his lavish parties — and Van — an Asian American actress who just lost her best friend to college and is feeling a bit off kilter. Josh is feeling similarly but he would never admit it. His best friend (also an actor) is basically the Zac Efron type — everyone loves him, he’s nabbing all the best roles, and he’s head over heels for Van’s best friend (the feeling is mutual). Josh and Van are unlikely friends but are thrown together in so many scenarios due to their absent best friends and working on the same set. In typical fashion, a reader might think this means these two are going to fall for each other but (and this is not a spoiler) no such luck. Instead, Dahlia gives us the makings of a solid friendship — even if our two main characters don’t know it yet.

This is why life is so great, right? It surprises us all the time.

And Van’s about to face a pretty big surprise herself. When she meets her publicist’s daughter/intern, she’s shocked to admit she’s attracted to her. After being locked in a superficial relationship with another celebrity and projecting the image of a “polite, squeaky-clean” Van — Brianna jolts her awake. Is she gay? This inner turmoil that Van is suddenly consumed with is so pitch perfect. It never felt dramatic. Her concerns are legit. She’s already worried about finding more roles as an Asian-American actress, her parents have lost patience with this “hobby” of hers and pretty much demand she start college or else, and now she might be gay? It’s not only a matter of how she feels about it but how will this LOOK to everyone else. (We may not be in Hollywood but aren’t we dealing with something similar every day with social media?) Van needs to get to a place where the real her takes precedence and everything else falls into place afterward. (And bravo to Brianna who is so refreshingly upfront with Van from the get-go about her own limits and experiences. No games, people.)

Van and Josh are both pushed to their breaking points in Under the Lights. How much longer can they do someone else’s bidding and ignore their own? What is the right next step? There are so many delectable layers to this story; Dahlia writes with such ease and thoughtfulness, and the chemistry between all the characters kept me hooked and reading mostly in one sitting. (I also have a soft spot for dancing scenes, and I am nuts for Light‘s dance scene.) While I highly recommend giving all of Dahlia’s books a whirl, this one, for me, definitely tops her work so far.

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Add UNDER THE LIGHTS to Goodreads | Buy on Amazon | Buy on B&N

⇒ Follow Dahlia @MissDahlELama & her website. ⇐

Dahlia’s Best Of New Adult List | 2014

Dahlia Adler New Adult AuthorHiya, friends! 2014 has been such a great year, and, personally, my Twitter feed and TBR list would not have flourished like it did without the influence of Dahlia. As a debut writer and fantastic blogger, it’s been a pleasure to check out her work, read about her adventures in publishing, and know she is always available for a book recommendation!

We’re thrilled to have her on Rather Be Reading Blog chatting about her favorites in the world of new adult books, especially as she prepares for the December 9th release of Last Will & Testament! More info on her latest contribution to new adult can be found below but before that, make sure your wallets and TBR lists are handy!


Thanks for having me, Estelle & Magan! Anyone who knows me at allllll knows I pride myself on my book recs, but because I blog primarily about YA (at both YA Misfits and Barnes & Noble), I don’t get to talk about NA as much as I’d like. (Except, on Twitter, where I talk about everything I like all day, every day.) So I was really excited when Rather Be Reading Blog asked me to share my recs for my favorite NA novels of the year, especially because I think it’s been a pretty great one for the category.

So, without further ado, here are my 2014 NA faves:

Deeper by Robin York – I had never read a novel by Ruthie Knox before embarking on this one under her NA pen name, but I knew I had several friends who were die-hard fans. And now I totally see why. Deeper grabbed me from the very first chapter, with the main character’s misery and strength and fierceness and growth and candor and ugh, just everything. As I said to the friends I promptly encouraged to read it when I finished, it’s full of the same tropes as lots of other NA, but there’s something about the way York writes them that made me believe them for what felt like the very first time. I know the “revenge porn” theme isn’t for everyone, but I just found it relevant and well done and good lord can York write a sex scene.

The Year We Fell Down and Understatement of the Year by Sarina Bowen – My good friend Katie recommend Bowen’s books to me, and I promptly devoured all three Ivy Years books in one week. Much as I’ve been loving NA lately, it’s pretty sorely lacking in diversity, so the fact that the series features a romance between two disabled students (one temporarily, one permanently) and one between two guys is pretty freaking huge. These books are sweet fun, and I’ll definitely be buying the next installment on release day.

Make it Count by Megan Erickson – What was really notable to me this year was the amount of light NA I enjoyed. That was something I really hadn’t been finding in NA, so Megan Erickson’s books were a serious gold mine. They’re so much fun, the characters have so much personality, and I particularly loved this first one for featuring a main character with dyslexia.

Best of New Adult Books 2014 Dahlia Adler 1

Swimming to Tokyo by Brenda St John Brown – Oh man, this book. I don’t know what I thought I was getting with it, but it was such a pleasant breath of fresh air. One of the traits I prize absolutely first and foremost in a person is being non-judgmental, and it struck me as I was reading that that was exactly main character Zosia. I just respected her in a way that felt really cool. Add serious chemistry between her and Finn, real family background, and the Tokyo setting, and you have a book that not nearly enough people are reading.

Caged in Winter by Brighton Walsh – Hot. Hot hotness. Cade is a tattooed chef, Winter’s a BAMF, and together, they’re just hot. I’m such a sucker for both guys who cook and girls with an edge, so I really loved this pairing and their chemistry, and the secondary characters too. I’ve been following the teasers for the next book in this series, and holy hell yes, I will be buying that.

The International School series by Chanel Cleeton – This was originally a duology, and now there’s a third book—French Kissed—I haven’t yet read but absolutely will. I love the setting of the international school and the diversity of the cast, not just because it’s nice to actually see diversity, but because the cultures of the different characters are really utilized in the personalities of the characters and the school’s social structure.

Best of New Adult Books 2014 Dahlia Adler 2

The Star Thief by Jamie Grey – I am so not a sci-fi person, but this one by Jamie Grey was a lot of fun. Super sexy, cool heroine with a great voice—definitely a pleasant surprise for almost-strictly-contemp me.

And finally, speaking of spec-fic NA, I loved The Wicked We Have Done by Sarah Harian, as well as the subsequent “insanely hot lesbian novella” (extremely accurate description), Our Broken Sky. I loved the concept and the writing style; perfect for a book that sort of straddled the lines of horror, thriller, and dystopian. And given the serious dearth of f/f NA, that novella was very appreciated.

Best of New Adult Books 2014 Dahlia Adler 3

Those are some favorites, but there were a lot more I enjoyed this year, and a lot of authors—both listed here and not—I’ll be keeping an eye on in 2015 and beyond. I’m so excited to be joining their NA ranks now, and I hope you guys like Last Will and Testament as much as I loved these!


Thanks so much for stopping in, Dahlia!

Last Will and Testament by Dahlia AdlerMore on Last Will & Testament (December 9, Smashwords): Lizzie Brandt was valedictorian of her high school class, but at Radleigh University, all she’s acing are partying and hooking up with the wrong guys. But all that changes when her parents are killed in a tragic accident, making her guardian to her two younger brothers. To keep them out of foster care, she’ll have to fix up her image, her life, and her GPA—fast. Too bad the only person on campus she can go to for help is her humorless, pedantic Byzantine History TA, Connor Lawson, who isn’t exactly Lizzie’s biggest fan.

But Connor surprises her. Not only is he a great tutor, but he’s also a pretty great babysitter. And chauffeur. And listener. And he understands exactly what it’s like to be on your own before you’re ready. Before long, Lizzie realizes having a responsible-adult type around has its perks… and that she’d like to do some rather irresponsible (but considerably adult) things with him as well. Good thing he’s not the kind of guy who’d ever reciprocate.

Until he does. Until they turn into far more than teacher and student. Until the relationship that helped put their lives back together threatens everything they both have left.

Goodreads | Buy on Amazon | Buy on B&N | Follow Dahlia: Blog + Twitter

Dahlia is also the author of Behind the Scenes, and the upcoming, Under the Lights.

If You’re Feeling [ Fill in the Blank ] Book Recs

Oh hey there. A Saturday post. Shocking, I know.

I like fun posts on the weekends so I hope you do too.

So I’ve been reading a lot this summer (no surprise there) and I wanted to give you a quick rundown of some of my favs. I haven’t formally reviewed these titles on Rather Be Reading Blog and I probably won’t but I had to get them on your radar somehow!

Let’s begin…

if you’re feeling like getting organized:

Objects of My Affection by Jill Smolinski

Lucy sold all her possessions and her house to send her teenage son to rehab, and now she’s been hired to organize and clean an old artist’s house. She is quite possibly the most difficult, frustrating client in the world but since Lucy wrote an entire book on organization it should be a snap, right? Wrong.

Objects of My Affection Circle

Final thoughts: This book made me laugh and got totally frustrated with the main character, who doesn’t know when to stop meddling. It’s kind of a great though; the narrator’s voice was fresh and very entertaining. I’m sad it took me so long to discover this one!

if you’re feeling musical:

The Sound of Us by Ashley Poston

Did you ever dream about bumping into your favorite musician? Junie certainly never wanted anything to do with Roman Holiday, a “has been” band that dealt with quite a bit of tragedy in the past. When she meets the lead singer on her summer vacation, she can’t believe how much they have in common or how much she actually likes him in person.

The Sound of Us by Ashley Poston

Final thoughts: I bought this book awhile ago at the urging of quite a few people, and finally read it a few weeks ago. Ever since, Springsteen has been following me everywhere. I thought it was sexy, honest, and fun and included so much of what people want in their YA: great friendships and diversity. Definitely worth downloading on your eReader.

if you’re feeling fancy:

Behind the Scenes by Dahlia Adler

Ever want to go on the set of TV show? We get a backstage pass because of Allie’s best friend, Vanessa, who just nabbed a leading lady role. To save money for college, Allie works as Vanessa’s tutor/assistant on set and gets to meet everyone’s celebrity dreamboat, Liam. Just as she starts to fall for him, PR decides Vanessa and Liam need to pretend they are dating to drum up enthusiasm for the new show. Drama, insecurity, the works!

Behind the Scenes Circle

Final thoughts: I keep calling this book the PERFECT Friday night date. I rarely sit in one spot and read a book for an entire evening but Behind the Scenes was one of those rare reads. As a debut, I thought Dahlia’s characters were incredibly realistic and I loved the dialogue. The Hollywood details were fun, and, ah, Liam really IS a dreamboat but in a nice boy kind of way… not like this unattainable thing. I’m so looking forward to the next book!

if you’re feeling shocking:

The One & Only by Emily Giffin

Texas. Football. Shea lives for both. But she’s also not sure what the future holds for her: career and romance-wise. After her best friend’s mom dies, life as she knows it completely changes. How she loves, who she reunites with, challenges of a new job, and more.

The One and Only Circle

Final thoughts: Ah. Ah. Ah. This book really tested me as a reader. I knew what was going to happen; the foreshadowing was there but somehow, shockingly, Giffin made me believe in this unconventional turn of events. If you love football, the South, and are an open-minded reader, you should pick this one up. I was surprised how attached I was to it; I haven’t read a Giffin in awhile and I wanted to buy this one immediately. (It’s so heavy though so I’ll wait for paperback.)

♥

 Are you feeling EXCITED, ELATED, BORED (no!), READY TO GO SHOPPING?

I hope so! I have to say — it’s been a very very enjoyable year of reading for me so far. Hope you feel the same.

Shelve It: Saturday & Summer

weekly feature to share the books magan and estelle are adding to their bookshelves each week

Oh man. It’s been about a month since I did one of these. But hello! I’m here. How are you all doing? It’s been a busy few weeks so far — friends visiting, lots of work changes, James finally got a small break from school, the weather is nice — you know the drill. Basically the books keep piling up and I haven’t shared them with you. Well, well, well. Today is your lucky day. Hope you find something in these piles that catches your eye!

Oh hey, it’s the first day of summer! Do something fun! And go wish Anna of Anna Reads a happy birthday!

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Let’s get started:

From Jamie (Perpetual Page Turner) ♥

Say What You Will by Cammie McGovern (I read this + loved it.)
Falling Into Place by Amy Zhang (September 2014)
Kiss of Broken Glass by Madeleine Kuderick (September 2014) — verse book!

From Elena (Novel Sounds) ♥

Some Girls Are by Courtney Summers
Starstruck by Rachel Shukert
The Comeback Season by Jennifer E. Smith (The original cover!)
Beauty Queens by Libba Bray (prepared to give this a second try)

From Maggie (Just a Couple More Pages) ♥

Boomerang by Noelle August (July 8 release)

Shelve It June 21 Gifted

From Bloomsbury (Thanks Courtney!)

My Best Friend, Maybe by Caela Carter (A favorite of 2014 for me.)
When Mr. Dog Bites by Brian Conaghan

From Harlequin (Thanks!)

The Fragile World by Paula Treick DeBoard (October 2014)

Shelve It June 21 For Review

Borrowed

Behind the Scenes by Dahla Adler (out 6/24; I really enjoyed it!); thanks Rachel!
Searching for Sky by Jillian Cantor; thanks Lauren!

Shelve It June 21 Borrowed

Bought

Since Last Summer by Johanna Philbin
Catching Jordan by Miranda Kenneally (My original copy got rained on.)
Racing Savannah by Miranda Kenneally
Triangles by Ellen Hopkins ($1 at my used bookstore) * verse + grown up book *
Cracked Up to Be by Courtney Summers ($1 at my used bookstore)

Shelve It June 21 Bought

(For my Nook)

Fever (A Songbird Novel) by Melissa Pearl
Ten Tiny Breaths by K.A. Tucker
Just One Night by Gayle Forman
The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks
Another Little Piece by Kate Karyus Quinn

Preordered 

In Deep by Terra McVoy (Out Jul8 8; read it this week + omg, can’t get enough)
Make It Real by Sabrina Elkins (eBook out July 1)

Big thanks to those who contributed to my book collection in the past couple of weeks! xoxo

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Actually, I’ve done pretty well on the “not buying as much” thing. Really! This is been a month of progress.

What’s been in your shopping bag lately? 🙂

Psst. Thanks for stopping in… we’ll be back tomorrow with a long overdue NAILED IT! 🙂