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Estelle: Adrenaline Crush by Laurie Boyle Crompton

Adrenaline Crush by Laurie Boyle Crompton ( web | tweet ) Publication Date: 9/23/2014 Publisher: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux Pages: 192 Target audience: Young adult Keywords: daredevil, therapy, falling in love, family Format read: ARC paperback from the publisher. (Thanks!) Summary: Dyna loves how she feels when she takes risks. When she gets seriously hurt in a fall, her mom […]

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October 8, 2014 - 10:54 pm

Alexa S. - The concept of Adrenaline Crush is pretty neat! I like that it really explores Dyna’s understanding of herself, as well as the relationships in her life. Even though the short length still stumps me, and I couldn’t get into the story well the first time I tried, I’m glad to hear that it was pretty good.

September 24, 2014 - 9:44 am

Adrenaline Crush by Laurie Boyle Crompton | Review + Giveaway -Katie's Book Blog - […] Rather Be Reading’s review: “All in all, the book kept me interested and was definitely enjoyable, even if it won’t be a forever favorite.” […]

September 22, 2014 - 3:04 pm

Lea @ YA Book Queen - Glad the author managed to fill those 192 pages – short books always make me nervous (although Something Like Normal managed to pleasantly surprise me – that book is amazing).

Nice review! 🙂

September 22, 2014 - 10:39 am

Jen @ Pop! Goes The Reader - I can still remember how shocked I was the first time I learned how short this novel is but I’m happy to hear that (for the most part) it doesn’t negatively affect the depth and resonance of the story itself. I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this novel on NetGalley and now I’m even more excited to begin it having read your review. Any sort of examination of familial relationships in YA literature is disappointingly rare, so I was particularly happy to hear that this was something Crompton touched upon. While it may not leave a lasting impression or prove a book I re-read again and again, I’m still really inspired by the subject matter and I can’t wait to experience it all firsthand 🙂 Thank you for the great, balanced review, Estelle!

Estelle: A Really Awesome Mess by Trish Cook + Brendan Halpin

A Really Awesome Mess by Trish Cook + Brendan Halpin Publication Date: July 23, 2013 Publisher: Egmont USA Pages: 288 Target audience: Young adult Keywords: therapy, depression, eating disorders Format read: eBook from Publisher via NetGalley (Thanks!) Summary: Justin and Emmy are two teens who meet at a therapy/boarding school where they are battling very different […]

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August 13, 2013 - 2:45 pm

Maggie @ Just a Couple More Pages - I think I read the first chapter or two of this one and I just couldn’t get into it. Even though you didn’t love it your review kind of makes me want to give it another shot.

(Last blog comment for me today, I’m catching up on my RSS reader after being gone for 2 weeks!)

August 11, 2013 - 11:24 am

Alexa Y. - The one thing I can say about this book? It’s definitely FUN. I can envision this as being a fun film, particularly with the exaggerated characters in the group of friends. Definitely a good read for me 🙂

August 5, 2013 - 7:33 pm

Bookworm1858 - I did not really like the pig aspect (felt drawn out and made it hard to eat my bacon sandwich) but I did enjoy the group meetings a ton and thought that was where the book really shone in addition to the tackling of less commonly discussed issues like feeling unwanted because adopted.

August 5, 2013 - 7:28 pm

Melissa @ Writer Grrl Reads - You had me at Harry Potter :). I’m going to see if my library has this one 😉

August 5, 2013 - 6:27 pm

Jen @ Pop! Goes The Reader - I’ve heard wonderful things about this story thus far and I’m really excited to read it, particularly after your Breakfast Club reference, which has always been one of my favourite films! From what I’ve heard A Really Awesome Mess has the potential to remove some of the stigma surrounding mental illness by approaching it in a more relatable manner, and like you, I love the fact that it focuses on identity issues stemming from adoption. One of my cousins is adopted and struggled with this throughout her infancy and teens and there was very little for her to turn to in the way of fiction covering these or similar issues. I’ll definitely be recommending this novel to her and picking it up myself!