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Estelle: Like No Other by Una LaMarche

Like No Other by Una LaMarche ( web | tweet ) Publication Date: July 24, 2014 Publisher: Penguin/Razorbill Pages: 352 Target audience: Young adult Keywords: New York City, forbidden romance, diversity, family Format read: Hardcover I purchased. Summary: During a horrible storm in New York City, Devorah and Jaxon find themselves stuck within the confines of a broken elevator. In the […]

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August 29, 2014 - 2:09 pm

Alexa S. - Oh, hello there book that YOU (Estelle) talked me into buying with a single word! But really, after reading your review, I’m quite eager to read Like No Other. I do love that it has sort of a Romeo-and-Juliet feel to it, though obviously it’s completely different. And I’m curious to see how LaMarche portrays New York, and these characters and their differences.

August 25, 2014 - 10:43 pm

Jess - This books sounds great, I like it when a novel can have a great sense of setting. Awesome review.

August 25, 2014 - 11:44 am

Lucy - We read this for Diversity book club and all really enjoyed it. Glad to see your “buy it” rating! I just loved Jaxon too, and you’re right the book was tense and exciting at the end! And I so agree with you that the book is such a love letter to the diversity of NY. Makes me want to get back there soon.
What a lovely review, Estelle!

August 25, 2014 - 9:56 am

Jen @ Pop! Goes The Reader - And here you were, worried that you could never do this story justice. Estelle, this review is stunning. Seriously. You perfectly captured everything that made Like No Other one of the most powerful, memorable novels I’ve read this year. It’s funny – Ordinarily, the almost instantaneous feelings that arise between Jaxon and Devorah would have been cause for concern, but somehow LaMarche makes it work. Like you, I was on the edge of my seat throughout the entirety of the book, desperate for them to make it work, despite everything that worked to separate them. Jaxon’s wide-eyed optimism and beautiful positive spirit was infectious. As you mentioned, I particularly liked that New York City was almost another character in the narrative. How often do we pass others from entirely different cultures, religions and backgrounds on the street, never pausing to give any real thought to what their life entails? The diversity in this story never felt false or artificial and I appreciated being given a glimpse into a way of life that was completely foreign to me. In short? You hit the nail of the head with this one, E. A wonderful, wonderful review. Thank you for sharing it with us.